What is the name of this LED ?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Zanac-X, Jun 28, 2012.

  1. Zanac-X

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 23, 2011
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    hey guys

    can anyone help me with any info about this type of LED like its name,data sheet,voltage... etc

    thanks very much
     
  2. Inquisitive

    New Member

    Nov 12, 2011
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    Looks like a standard mini Christmas light to me.
     
  3. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    Its an LED Christmas light bulb..
    The LEDs inside the housing vary from manufacturer to manufacturer..
     
  4. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    Are you sure it is a LED and not a light bulb
     
  5. BillB3857

    Senior Member

    Feb 28, 2009
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    Looks like a flasher Christmas tree light to me. May need to break it open to verify contents.
     
  6. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    looking at the closer picture there doesn't seem to be an LED in there..Its just a regular bulb.
     
  7. Zanac-X

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 23, 2011
    51
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    ok....so its a bulb but i didnt get any info about it like its resistance, its max voltage or can i operate it on AC-DC
     
  8. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    A conventional light bulb can operate on both DC and AC. For AC use the RMS value. Regarding the specs. I do not have any clue at all.
     
  9. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    It's a standard Christmas light, possibly a blinker due to the lower darker arm. The arm heats up when the bulb is lit, so it moves and beaks contact. Bulb goes off, cools, arm moves back, bulb lights, cycle repeats.

    An oft misunderstood part of these bulbs is the coil of wires around the two leads to the filament: these are there to short the bulb if the filament burns out. Note it is NOT a resistor, and if you compare the resistance of a burned out bulb to a working bulb the burned out one has a lower resistance!

    This is due to some interesting physics: these bulbs run in a series circuit of (typically) 35 or 50 bulbs. When a bulb burns out and opens it blocks the passage of current, so instead of seeing 1/35th or 1/50th of the line voltage it sees the full line voltage. This causes an arc to the thin insulation on this coil, which then arcs and welds itself across the now open filament, thus letting the other 34 or 49 bulbs remain lit.

    Obviously as more and more bulbs burn out the remainder run hotter and hotter. Eventually they will fail machine gun fashion but it does provide a more graceful degradation of functionality (and a chance for repair to the very observant).

    The best way to get the voltage this bulb runs at is to get the light string it came from and count the bulbs. Divide the line voltage b that number and you have it's operating voltage.
     
  10. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    When one filament blows, the one lamp will only see 1/35 or 1/50 of the line voltage.

    Typically, such a Christmas tree lamp will run on 1.5 to 3V AC or DC.

    You can tell if it is a flasher or not by looking closely to see if there is a bi-metallic circuit breaker in the bulb.

    Ordinary Christmas tree bulb:

    [​IMG]



    Christmas tree flasher:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2012
  11. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
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    The others are half-right. It is a standard incandescent christmas light bulb, not an LED. It is not a flasher, however. A flasher has a third "arm" that moves back and forth between the contacts, whereas yours only has two. This is basically what yours is:

    [​IMG]

    You can generally assume that a christmas light bulb runs on about 2.5 volts, but it varies widely.
     
  12. KJ6EAD

    Senior Member

    Apr 30, 2011
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    The last time I bought incandescent Christmas lights (a long time ago) they were all wired in series groups of 20 so the bulbs were all 6V.
     
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  13. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
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    I've always had them wired in groups of 50, so 120v/50 bulbs = 2.4v/bulb.
     
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