What is the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for Nanotubes?

Discussion in 'General Science' started by DarleneEavers, May 14, 2009.

  1. DarleneEavers

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 5, 2009
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    Hello All Member,

    What is the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for Nanotubes?

    Please share your information here...
    :rolleyes:
     
  2. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
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    You can easily search for MSDS sheets on the web. Each manufacturer will have one, and most make them available on their websites.
     
  3. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    I doubt you will find such an item for nanotubes, since they are at the forefront of current research. There will be someday, but right now they are having to make each batch individually, and nanotubes aren't one thing, they are a large group of things, similar to hydrocarbons. Basically it is like finding a MSD for unobtainium.
     
  4. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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  5. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Now that is funny. They classed it as a form of graphite, and rated it accordingly. It's not, of course, but it comes across as a company that had to have something on file.

    When the science progresses far enough they can rate individual types of nanotubes (and bucky balls, which is a close cousin, just like graphite) then there will lots of MSD sheets out. Thing about nanotubes and buckyballs is they are hollow, and also come in many diameters, so the chemical and mechanical permutations are going to be vast. This is a nanotech material, after all.

    One of the things they discovered about soot is it is naturally occuring bucky balls, imperfect ones. It helped explain a lot of problems sootology was having with soot's properties. There really is such a specialty, though I may have spelled it wrong.

    Besides the electronics properties of nanotubes (aka bucky tubes) I'm looking forward to the monofiliment properties. The old science fiction theme of superstrong super thin rope that can be used to cut and support loads isn't that far away, I'm thinking.
     
  6. DarleneEavers

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 5, 2009
    11
    0
    Yeah I Agree with you.

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 5, 2009
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