What is cheapest way to learn about embedded syatem

Discussion in 'Embedded Systems and Microcontrollers' started by singh_mastermind2007, Feb 16, 2008.

  1. singh_mastermind2007

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 16, 2008
    :confused:I am diploma holder I have a 9 yrs exp. in electronics filed. Presently i Think to get a training on embedded system but in market they will charge alot of amount for that so kindly suggest me the cheaest way to learn the embededded techology
  2. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    With no knowledge of your area of interest, that is impossible to answer. There is a long thread in this forum that talks about AVR vs. PIC microcontrollers which might shed some light on your question.

    Beyond that, though, there are many different microcontrollers available - far too many for us to be able to deal with. As a suggestion, try to think of what application interests you most, and see if you can find the microprocessor most used for that application. That would probably be the best one for you to study.

    The manufacturer always has the complete specification sheet for all of their devices available online. You can always get those for free. There is almost always a big library of code examples and application examples that go with a device, also free.
  3. Papabravo


    Feb 24, 2006
    In absolute terms the cheapest way is to avoid the subject altogether. After that I would suggest reading freely available datasheets. Then find a simulator (MPLAB for example) and learn to write programs in assembly language. With a little bit of luck you may never have to actually put one of your programs in an actual piece of hardware.
  4. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
    I concur with Papabravo's suggestion. You could start at the MPLAB page at Microchip and work through the information there.

  5. hgmjr


    Jan 28, 2005
    What do you consider cheap?

    There are a number of very useful microcontroller software/hardware development kits for the various microcontrollers on the market. I think you will need to spend at least in the neighborhood of $100 USD by the time you get a programmer, a development board and a power supply.

    Once you have committed to the hardware and software you will need to get started, then you will need to spend time in intensive self-learning to gain experience in programming as well as familiarizing yourself with the microcontroller you have selected to study. This is going to take several months at a minimum and it could take years to become proficient.

  6. beck


    Nov 27, 2006