What fields are in demand now?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by tony8404, May 12, 2009.

  1. tony8404

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    Jun 11, 2008
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    Okay, today i am searching around a bit on the different fields of electronics... What i mean is this, when i say i want to be an engineer i still do not know what fields are out there for engineering in electronics... i know there is RF engineer but not much more. I went to the department of labor to search on the different fields of electronic or electrical to read up on them to see which is for me to go for... i want to start off as a electronic technician due to schooling i figure i can get maybe an associates degree get in the door and then have them pay for engineering schooling...

    Is there a website that explains the different electronic jobs out there>? thanks
     
  2. tony8404

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    Jun 11, 2008
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    what field is in high demand and pays decently and would not require a bachelors yet?
     
  3. loosewire

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    Tony8404,where everybody when you need them? Sorry (Guys)did not see wanna be.
     
  4. loosewire

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    google-Deloitte u.s. Also national assoc manufacturers.
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2009
  5. tony8404

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    thanks loosewire i will check into those sites
     
  6. KL7AJ

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    1) Medical technology, especially gerontology
    2) Robotics...related to #1 above
    3) Power Generation
    4) Materials Engineering, composites, plastics, organic semiconductors
    5) Cellphone....however this may peak quickly as coverage is just about saturated...even in Alaska!

    Eric
     
  7. tony8404

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    Jun 11, 2008
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    Kl7aj, that is what i am looking for examples... Now out of those that you mentioned, would i just need a electronic technician bachelor degree or associate degree? also, is each example you have require a different degree?
     
  8. tony8404

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    Jun 11, 2008
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    also, i was looking at a community college around my area due to the low cost on classes since i am in the area it is like 125 a credit hour nonresidential, since i am residential i only pay 25 dollars a credit hour... if you could check the link to the electronic/computer technician associate degree in this link would it be worth it for me ???? http://www.morainevalley.edu/programs/2008-2009/2008-2009_fall/1281_course.htm
     
  9. loosewire

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    Its says nothing about degree.
     
  10. KL7AJ

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    Hi Tony:

    I can't speak too generally, since my own path was quite unique. I have precisely half of an electrical engineering degree, yet worked as a staff development engineer for the UCLA Plasma Physics department for ten years. I just happened to be in the right place, with the right experience, at the right time. I wouldn't recommend my path to all but the most adventuresome!

    Then again...maybe I would. I am having more fun right now than any man deserves.

    It may be a while before you get a degree...but until then, I'd do anything I could to become at least CONNECTED with someone in one of the above fields. There is a whole new class of professional...the engineering technician...that is becoming more appreciated all the time. He is the link between the engineer and the product applications team. You don't need a degree for a lot of engineering tech jobs....the experience you grew up with in your dad's garage is just what a lot of R and D people are looking for. (Read the biographies of Michael Faraday and James Maxwell.....Faraday was the epitome of the engineering technician!)

    And here's another secret....SHHHH!....don't tell a soul. Technical writing is a hot field....and the nice thing about it, is you can move around between fields a bit. Good tech writing is good tech writing. But you have to LOVE the English language to pull it off. This is really something you have to be cut out for, or you'll be absolutely miserable! The world doesn't need any more poorly written tech manuals. People will pay you handsomely for tech literature that's well-written, literate, and literary.

    (If you can understand the difference between the latter two, you might have a chance!)


    Eric
     
  11. StayatHomeElectronics

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    Sep 25, 2008
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    tony8404,

    All of the different fields that were mentioned by KL7AJ will require people of different education levels.

    Each task requires different skill levels. When I worked for a telecommunications company, we had people who were electronic technicians for the production department and to support engineering, design and testing. We had associate level engineers who got slightly more independent work for supporting design and testing. Bachelors, Masters, and PhD level engineers were the bulk of the research and design and got to oversee some of the technician levels. All of the different levels are needed depending on what the companies in these fields actually do. We designed and manufactured our own products.

    Also know, when people see what kind of work you are capable and willing to do, you could advance up the ladder with more responsibility. Our Director of Software Development had only a high school diploma, but he was pretty amazing what he could do. He was, and still is, incredibly motivated to learn.
     
  12. tony8404

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    Jun 11, 2008
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    I am curious now to find out more about the engineering technician....

    Is there an associates or bachelors degree for engineering technician i cannot find it right now...
     
  13. StayatHomeElectronics

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    Our engineering technicians all had associates degrees.
     
  14. tony8404

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    what is that degree called that your engineering technicians went for or had recieved? i try looking up engineering technicians and cannot really find on that specific name... i see electronic technician would that be another name for it?
     
  15. StayatHomeElectronics

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    I think it was Electronics Engineering Technology at places like ITT Tech. There are probably similar schools near you.
     
  16. tony8404

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  17. StayatHomeElectronics

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    I think the best thing to do is to speak with someone from the college about the program and see if it matches up with what you would like to do. I saw a link for the admissions office and academic advisers at the school on the link you posted. Ask them what kind of career the degree is good for and where their graduates get work, if that is available. I would also ask them about the benefit of their degree over something like ITT Tech. Don't be afraid to ask any questions that you have, you are potentially going to spend a lot of time and money in the program.

    Do the same thing at ITT tech.

    Sometimes a face-to-face or phone conversation can do a lot to help clear things up.
     
  18. tony8404

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    Jun 11, 2008
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    lol, i had called itt tech up about a month ago.... there no help they just want you to sign up...

    I kid you not about an hour ago i was typing a reply to this thread and my phone rang... it went to voice mail... i checked it and it was a hang up... so i took google.com and typed the phone number in it and guess where it was from... LOL ITT-tech..... they still wont leave me alone and it has been over a month... that is why i posted the links cause i also called the community college today and they are not asking me to sign up right this second like ITT... i am gonna go to the community college next friday since i have that day off...

    the reason i posted the two links is due to the differences in the classes for the course... itt has more classes for there associates and the community college does not...

    Also, would online or actually being in the class hands on be better>?
     
  19. tony8404

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    Jun 11, 2008
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    my point also is that the community college associate degree is only gonna cost me 5,169.00 god only knows how much the ITT associate degree will cost me...

    this is why i had mentioned the difference in the courses that come with that degree.

    I do not mind talking to the school but i hate when they pressure you. The community college had no pressure not like ITT still calling me after a month.

    I had to pretty much ask 3 times to the lady what day to stop in to speak with an advisor. lol

    I would not mind taking it online but i feel it just is not the same
     
  20. KL7AJ

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    Since I teach community college, my unbiased opinion would be that you'd be better off getting a genuine AA degree therefrom.

    Just my totally objective, unvarnished opinion, mind you. :)

    eric
     
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