what does UV means in circuitry?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by cczone, Dec 29, 2008.

  1. cczone

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 17, 2008
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    I'd seen many UV in a wattmeter circuit which looks like ground.
    What does UV stands for in circuit?
    Thanks
     
  2. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    It is the abbreviation for microvolts.

    hgmjr
     
  3. cczone

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 17, 2008
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    Thanks....
    so it meant for small voltage supply or ground? :)
     
  4. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    Yes it is meant for small voltages. However, you can use it to measure larger voltages by designing the proper resistive padding network.

    hgmjr
     
  5. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    Just so you understand how small a uV is:
    1mV (millivolt) is 1/1000 of 1v.
    1uV (microvolt) is 1/1000 of 1mV, or 1/1,000,000 of 1v.
     
  6. KMoffett

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 19, 2007
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    Can you post the circuit?

    Ken
     
  7. cczone

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 17, 2008
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  8. KMoffett

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 19, 2007
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    Looks like it is just a letter reference designation to all connections made to the "SOURCE-" in the lower-left of the schematic...not a universal thing in electronic schematics.

    Ken
     
  9. cczone

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 17, 2008
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    erm...sorry but does that means anything beside designation? :confused:
     
  10. KMoffett

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 19, 2007
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    Nope...I don't think so. Instead of "UV", it could have been labeled "SOURCE-" or "A" or "G" or "COM" or "123" or any other way to relate the connections throughout that schematic that connect to the line between SOURCE- and the R15.

    Ken
     
  11. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    Now that I have the schematic to refer to the answer to your question is a bit clearer. The "UV" label you were asking about is actually 0V and just appears to be "UV" since the upper part of the 0 is obscured by the horizontal bar in the ground symbol.

    hgmjr
     
  12. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    It looks like "0V", not "UV" which would be consistant with its use as a ground symbol. Considering the confusion that it caused, it seems a less than professional thing to do.

    Edit -- constructed my response before reading the above post. I agree with what hgmjr said.
     
  13. cczone

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 17, 2008
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    OK..thanks bro for helping. :D
     
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