What do you think? Is this possible?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by kavkav, May 12, 2013.

  1. kavkav

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 1, 2013
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  2. Wendy

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    Mar 24, 2008
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    William Beaty is a well known name out there. He tends to do fringe science, he is always pushing alternate explanations that the majority of electronics types do not necessarily agree with. I would be very careful taking his word on anything electronic without double checking.

    The fact is no one has been able to quite duplicate Tesla's results. Perhaps, and Beaty suggests, everyone is missing something obvious, or perhaps the world does not work quite the way Tesla thought it did. The only way we will ever truly know if someone does repeat Tesla's work. One of the cornerstones of science is repeatability.

    One last note, note the free energy advert at the bottom of the article, this is pseudo science at it's worst. There ain't no such thing as a free lunch.
     
  3. chuckey

    Well-Known Member

    Jun 4, 2007
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    I have read somewhere that the single wire transmission line is a reality. The point glossed over is that you need a 6 wavelength long transition section from coax to wire. the idea of using a "long thin coil" again is used in a traveling wave tube (UHF/SHF transmitter tube) to effectively reduce the physical wavelength of the RF.
    Frank
     
  4. kavkav

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 1, 2013
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    Thanks for the reply guys. I've been watching some videos on Youtube regarding singlewire power transmission. It looks like it works but there is no perfect power readings that show how efficient it really is. One guy had slightly more output voltage than his input but he didn't know why. I think it could have been his windings being slightly off making it output more voltage but at a lower current. Even if that were the case it could still mean it's efficiency is up there. It would be cool to see one properly measured and clear video of this experiment.
     
  5. bountyhunter

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    Pure BS. There is no such thing a single wire "circuit" since electrons have to return in some way, even if it is by having waves pass through space or having current flow through the ground as old-style telegraph systems did which used a "single wire". I am not sure what the point of the article is other than to set people up to invest money in a perpetual motion machine or some other bogus scam.
     
  6. kavkav

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 1, 2013
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    Well I still don't understand why it wouldn't work. If a magnet were to pass through a wire loop, would it not move the electrons in the wire either clockwise or counter clockwise?

    Now in the case of the single wire, the electrons would have no where to go BUT the metal spheres have valence electrons and since metal can have a charge, the spheres may be acting like electron sinks moving into one sphere and back to the opposite sphere at the rate of the frequency of the magnetic field. I'm no expert at electrical engineering but I do have a strong foundation in physics and what I mentioned supports what I have also learned in chemistry.

    But once again that is just how I see it working, I don't know for sure. And if it doesn't work, what is stopping it from working?
     
  7. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Because electricity needs a circuit, this is fundamental. It needs a return path for the electrons to truly flow. No circuit, no flow, you have potential energy instead. What do you think an on/off switch does?

    Static electricity is very small power levels when you are talking wattages. Having a million volts by itself is useless, and static electricity is in the arena of electric force.

    There is such thing as a single line transmission line, it uses earth as the return conductor. Since the earth is a poor power conductor, the losses are horrific, and not economical to sustain. Since the earth is the return path, it is a two conductor system.
     
  8. LDC3

    Active Member

    Apr 27, 2013
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    If this was entirely true, than an antenna would not work. After all, one end is connected to our circuit, and the other end is up in the air.

    The principle at work here is similar to power transmission through the air, but is controlled by a guiding line. The line keeps the power confined to a small region, instead of spreading out and diffusing (like a laser compared to a flashlight).
     
  9. bountyhunter

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    Do you think the transmitter and receiver are somehow isolated from the earth? All transmission cables have a second conductor. Look at the coax to your TV antenna: center conductor (signal) and outside sheath which is the ground return.
     
  10. bountyhunter

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    Sep 7, 2009
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    I went to school with the guys who were going to work for the power industry. They are obsessed with trying to find a way to get a micro fraction of a percent improvement in power transmission, because it translates into massive $$$ for them. Believe me, if there was any way this could fly, they would be flying it.
     
  11. shortbus

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 30, 2009
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    It's been discovered and then bought by the big power companies. They store it in the same warehouse as the 200 MPG carburetor that was made in the 1950s. :p
     
  12. kavkav

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 1, 2013
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    Well it was interesting to read the different opinions. I guess the only way to really find out is to do the experiment with clear cut measurements.
     
  13. kavkav

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    Jan 1, 2013
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    What about cell phones? (I'm not trying to be smart I just want to understand what you mean exactly because I'm still learning circuits.)
     
  14. bountyhunter

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    The filing cabinet next to the carburetor has the original video of the moon landing they shot at the lot behind Universal Studios......
     
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  15. bountyhunter

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    Sep 7, 2009
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    Cell phones (or a portable radio of anykind) forms a closed circuit antenna loop contained in the receiver. radio waves strike the loop and cause current flow in it. But a transmitter still operates on the laws of electronics. A "one wire" transmission line has to have a return path.
     
  16. bountyhunter

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    Go for it.
     
  17. kavkav

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 1, 2013
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    Thanks for the explanation. I guess I'll make it my summer project. I've seen enough videos to believe it works. But only way to know for sure is if I do it myself.
     
  18. LDC3

    Active Member

    Apr 27, 2013
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    I need to be at home to draw a diagram, but the coax is to shield the lead line from picking up additional signals. The antenna is only connected at one end and the other end is way up in the air. Look up an broadcasting or receiving circuit if you don't believe me.
     
  19. t_n_k

    AAC Fanatic!

    Mar 6, 2009
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    Might be worth reviewing the role of the coaxial cable between the transceiver and the antenna. The coaxial line is a transmission line - not primarily a means of shielding the signal from unwanted signals.

    If you consider the current in the coax under transmit conditions with a properly fed / matched antenna load one has equal magnitude currents flowing along the inner conductor (outer surface) and the shield (inner surface). They inner core & shield currents are (of course) flowing in opposite directions.
     
  20. LDC3

    Active Member

    Apr 27, 2013
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    As I wanted to point out that an antenna is only connected at one end, here is a schematic for a FM receiver - http://www.electroschematics.com/5150/tiny-fm-radio/

    You will see that the antenna has only one end connected. When you want a powerful transmitter (as radio stations do), then a ground plane is added and loading on the antenna to tune the antenna to the correct frequency. The ground plane for radio stations is the earth; for ham radios 4 wires are strung out from the base of the antenna. Loading an antenna will shorten the length needed to match the antenna with the wavelength. I.E. a 200 ft antenna with loading works as well as a 300 ft antenna without loading. So a radio station will pump their 10000 watts of power into the bottom of the antenna that sticks up in the air 200 ft (or more).

    Now back to the original topic.

    The transmitting coil generates a magnetic / electric field which travels along the wire to the receiving coil. Without the wire, the amount of power received is greatly diminished. With the single strand of wire, the power received is noticeably greater. There is no need for the wire to be part of a circuit since the magnetic / electric field is only moving in one direction. This is how the power is transmitted along a single wire that is not a circuit.
    The antenna works in a similar fashion.
     
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