What Compiler do you use

Discussion in 'Programmer's Corner' started by TheFox, Oct 18, 2011.

  1. TheFox

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 29, 2009
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    I was reading the forums, and realized I use an older version of Visual Studios (2008), I was wondering what everyone else uses to compile their favorite language.
     
  2. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
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    I use python 2.6.5 for most things (of course, it's an interpreted language). When I need a C/C++ compiler, I use the MinGW installation on my machine, which is version 3.4.5.

    About 12 years ago I was working on a team that was making an NT driver for a well-known product and wondered why they were using a Microsoft compiler that was 3 or 4 versions behind the current version. The architect told me that they had so much turmoil dealing with compiler bugs that changing to a new compiler version was such a big deal for the team that it was very rarely done. This was also the case in the product's firmware, which was being compiled on various UNIX machines using a supported version of gcc (these products generated many billions of dollars of revenue, so decisions were made carefully). Once you've spent lots of time dealing with a broken product make because of an upgrade of a tool, you become a believer in this practice.

    I've successfully compiled hundreds of packages and tools with the C/C++ compiler I'm using and I won't be upgrading anytime soon. :p
     
  3. TheFox

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 29, 2009
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    I never see any reason to upgrade, if what I have works well enough. I guess I should have added interpreters too. Over sight on my part. (x: )
     
  4. debjit625

    Well-Known Member

    Apr 17, 2010
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    I used Visual Studio Express Edition 2010 but I didn't liked it much so I switched back to Visual Studio Express Edition 2008 both for C++ and C#.Sometimes I also use MinGW with CodeBlock as IDE.
     
  5. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    I only use C for micros(Hi_tech C). On windows I use Labview
     
  6. kubeek

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 20, 2005
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    I use Netbeans IDE and cygwin gcc as compiler.
     
  7. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    I find that VB v6 fits most of my needs, and those are typically quickly turning out test programs. Test programs are typically:

    {set relays}
    {set meter}
    {wait a bit}
    {read meter}
    {eval results}

    {next}

    So there ain't a lot happening there and speed of execution is completely irrelevant.

    I've tried VB 2008 or 2010 and while I can see why some stuff was added it is a hugely steep learning curve over v6 to access all the dot net stuff.

    Latest big PC app I had to interface a Borland Delphi (visual Pascal) module and found it simplest just to write the entire app in Delphi, a language I came to like. I did need to show some video on screen and that was encapsulated in a dll written in VC v6 I believe, though I may have used a version of Studio Express.

    That was a rather fun application. I was given a huge automatic laser that no one knew how to use that we needed for semiconductor processing. When I was done you could align the optics to the part either by clicking screen buttons, keyboard shortcuts, or even click and drag the on screen video of the part itself.

    Then when you got it aligned you hit CTRL-DELETE and literally blew stuff up.

    When going to the embedded world C suits me most of the time, occasionally assembler but I avoid that when I can.
     
  8. debjit625

    Well-Known Member

    Apr 17, 2010
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    I thought we are talking about application programming....
    For embedded programming I use a mixture of assembly and C and their are many assemblers and compilers I use, like for Intel x86 processor(P4) I use NASM,TASM,Cygwin,Microsoft C compilers with MASM.Mostly for microcontrollers I dont use assembly much, but sometimes I use it.I work on Microchip's and ATMEL's mcu much so for Microchip I use MPLAB as IDE and HI TECH C and MPLAB C for PIC24 and dsPIC as C compilers and sometimes MikroC too.And for ATMEL its keil uVision4 with included compilers and assemblers like C51,A51 .... etc
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2011
  9. TheFox

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 29, 2009
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    I did originally mean application programming; but I am curious about embedded as well.
     
  10. nigelwright7557

    Senior Member

    May 10, 2008
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    I get on best with visual C# express, it is very helpful with intelisense.

    When I have to I use C++ express tho this is much less user friendly than c#
     
  11. kubeek

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 20, 2005
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    For Atmel chips I use avr-gcc with avr-libc library.
     
  12. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    Fox,

    Since you opened up the thread to embedded tools, lately I have started learning to program ARM7 processors. Specifically, the ARM I have chosen to learn is ATMEL's AT91SAM7X256. Programming is accomplished with the combination of ECLIPSE, YAGARTO, and OPENOCD.

    ECLIPSE is a generic free IDE.

    YAGARTO is the free C compiler.

    Open source programming utility OPENOCD is being used in conjumction with OLIMEX's ARM-USB-OCD programmer to program the ARM processor using the JTAG interface.


    hgmjr
     
  13. samin

    Member

    Oct 14, 2011
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    I would use Borland but it always says it can't find my includes, so I just use Dev-C++.
     
  14. nickelflipper

    Active Member

    Jun 2, 2010
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    GCBasic as an open source compiler for PIC's, and AVR's. The open source FreeBasic makes the GCBasic.exe.
     
  15. TheFox

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 29, 2009
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    I noticed that too, I kinda assumed that they Microsoft was subtly trying to push people to their language.

    That's got me to thinking about getting a C compiler; just to play around with. Even though I use VC++ 08 all the time.

    How well does Dev-C++ work? Every thing I heard (from extremely biased source) that it doesn't work that well. How well do you like it? On this topic though; It's to each their own.
     
  16. cheezewizz

    Active Member

    Apr 16, 2009
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    For c/c++ I like Mingw (wxWidgets for GUIs), though I've just started at uni (again) after a long gap and they love their VS2010 with c# which is good for people just starting out with the Intellisense and wizards. Though I prefer Notepad++ as my editor, not quite Intellisense but it does have code completion and the ability to collapse code which is well handy. And it doesn't take ages to start up, I'm looking at you visual studio...
     
  17. debjit625

    Well-Known Member

    Apr 17, 2010
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    You need the include files and library files like Platform Software Development Kit (PSDK) and also built the configuration file for the compiler. Configuration files contains the paths for the compiler and linker for include (*.h),library(*.lib),object(*.obj) files.
    I don't use Borland much but sometimes for certain application its optimization and the object code is good enough.

    No, C++ is a native language its very complex as it use library functions or functions that OS provides, and C# is based on a framework (dot Net) so many things comes in a boundary which makes it possible to make that kind of intelisense. Visual C++ also have intelisense but those are built using the available header files definitions.
    And anyway people who programmed in C/C++ for years will not need the intelisense much...
     
  18. upand_at_them

    Active Member

    May 15, 2010
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    We still use VB6 at work, because it works and haven't had a need to change. Back when Microsoft announced dropping support for VB6 the developer community complained (because so many were still using it).

    Heck, I still like using serial ports. USB is a big bloody mess.
     
  19. TheFox

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 29, 2009
    66
    5
    Hey, it only takes me about five minutes to boot it up.:p

    I stand corrected. Every little bit helps, though.
     
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