What can be put over a ripped pad/solder point?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by GPhillips, Jul 1, 2016.

  1. GPhillips

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 19, 2016
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    Hi everyone, this somewhat relates to my previous topic.

    If a solder pad/point is ripped or damaged, I believe it won't affect the functionally of a system in a negative way, other than being unable to solder/connect a wire to that point (correct me if I'm wrong). My question is, can green lacquer (also known as "solder mask" I believe) be put over those damaged points?

    I know this could sound a bit silly, but I feel it would be for cosmetic purposes and just make it look neat again I guess.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. RichardO

    Well-Known Member

    May 4, 2013
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    Go to the beauty products counter and find a nail polish of the same color as the solder mask on you PCB. Be aware that there are a mind numbing number of color choices available so you may have to try more than one color to get the "perfect" match.
     
  3. GPhillips

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 19, 2016
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    That sounds good, thanks.
     
  4. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
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    I apologize that I don't fully understand the question:confused: -- If the land in question will not be used, it may, of course, be covered in any manner consistent with the chemical and electrical integrity of the board -- Otherwise repair will require application of adhesive Cu foil or some-such...

    Best regards
    HP:)
     
  5. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    If you've ripped out a copper path that actually does something - no amount of varnish will magically complete the damaged circuit.

    My method is to clean back the green varnish to expose enough copper track to anchor some bodge wire.

    You can scrape the varnish off with a scalpel if you're careful not to dig out chunks of copper. A pencil type glass fibre brush is less danger to the tracks, but you end up cleaning an area about 3/4 Cm wide.

    Various sizes of tinned copper wire can be soldered on to repair damaged tracks - if you pull it tight and stretch it straight as it comes off the reel, that makes it much easier to form to the shape of the tracks. 30AWG wire wrap wire can be stripped and used to repair fine tracks.

    When I did full time servicing - sometimes I had to repair boards after a burn up. You have to cut and file to remove the carbonised PCB material, in a few severe cases; a lattice of tinned copper wire spanned a hole in the board, and sometimes supported components.
     
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  6. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    I have also used solder wick in some cases to repair a burnt trace.
    Max.
     
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  7. Hypatia's Protege

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    A note of caution -- Please don't even think of 'Circuit Writer pens' or Au, Ag, Ni, powder conductive glues! Even is the additional resistance tolerable, be advised that such applications are unstable with time (as the binder degrades) -- As I've learned to my cost!:mad::mad::mad:

    Best regards
    HP:)
     
  8. GPhillips

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 19, 2016
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    Thanks for the feedback everyone, however something has come to my attention.

    I may have been a little confused, and whether this makes a difference or not, I'm not sure. I learnt the term I think I should have been using, and that is "SMD", those are the type of pads I wanted to know about. Sorry about this, but if an SMD pad has been ripped or damaged, will it affect the functionality of a motherboard/system?
     
  9. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    Any kind of stranded wire introduces the risk of shorts between tracks.

    You can use upto 16SWG - and if necessary, lay several side by side.
     
  10. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
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    Not as long as the land is unoccupied AND the damage does not include/affect an inter-layer connection (if any)...

    Best regards
    HP:)
     
  11. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    It is NOT stranded wire, per-se, but woven/plaited copper strip?
    Obviously when used adjacent traces have to be taken into account.
    But it does not exhibit loose strands?.
    Max.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2016
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  12. GPhillips

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 19, 2016
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    Thanks, so if I understand correctly would that mean as long as there's no component attached to the pad it should be fine? Also, for interest sake, can an SMD pad be repaired, so that any inter-layer connections aren't affected?

    Thanks again.
     
  13. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
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    Yes - so long as any such connections are undamaged at the outset - FWIW a SMD land is quite unlikely to correspond to an inter-layer link - my mention of same was with the aim of keeping all possibilities open, as it were:cool: --- FWIW an image of the damaged feature would be most helpful:)

    Very best regards
    HP:)
     
  14. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
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    I wish to add my voice to that of @MaxHeadRoom -- Desoldering wick is an excellent choice Re: PCB trace repair (for it's factory impregnated flux and geometry [the latter offering good current handling capability with minimized inductance and 'skin effect' losses])

    For the benefit of those unfamiliar with said products, I offer these images -- Note that the first image shows typical product packaging whereas the latter illustrates the glabrous form of the braid:

    Desold1.JPG

    Desold2.JPG
    Best regards
    HP:)
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2016
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  15. GPhillips

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 19, 2016
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    That's good to know,

    This is actually an Xbox 360 motherboard. The FT6U points are SMD pads I believe, as people solder to them for modding purposes, however correct me if I'm wrong.

    Here's 3 pics:

    Pads Intact
    Pads Damaged
    Otherside of Board (VIAs)

    I know the damaged pads look pretty bad, was done with inadequate soldering knowledge and a one-temp soldering iron.

    I know the traces could probably be soldered to if needed, but are those pads itself done for, and if not how does one fix it? Thanks.
     
  16. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    They generally tend not to put SMD parts directly on vias, but they can be very close.

    A damaged via is easy to repair as long as it doesn't include tracks on interior layers - if they do; kludge wires may be the only possibility of repair. And you need to know where it went to do that.
     
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  17. Hypatia's Protege

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    That's where radiography comes in handy!:D

    Best regards
    HP
     
  18. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

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    I dunno -- they look more like vias than SMD pads?:confused::eek: -- If the unit works, I'd seal the damaged area with lacquer and count my blessings:cool:

    Very best regards
    HP:)
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2016
  19. GPhillips

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 19, 2016
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    They probably are VIAs if you say they are, I thought at one point they were SMDs, but looking at it again I think you're right. Thankfully the unit still works, that's why I was wondering if those types of pads affect the board, but I'll see what happens.

    Thanks.
     
  20. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
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    The fact that the unit is yet functional tells me that the 'collars' and/or electroplating is yet intact!:cool: -- Please! Don't even think about soldering, filing or otherwise disturbing them!:eek: -- Just seal the area with PCB lacquer and call it good!:cool:

    Best regards
    HP:)

    PS:
    Disambiguation: "PCB" above expands to 'Printed Circuit Board' as opposed to 'PolyChlorinated Biphenyls':)
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2016
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