What are ARM development kits good for?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by KeepYourChinUp, Jun 20, 2014.

  1. KeepYourChinUp

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 18, 2014
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    As you can tell by the title, I have no idea what these are used for. Sure they're probably designed for small little personal projects but what exactly can you do with them?

    Anyone here used them? What did you do with your arm board?
     
  2. timwhite

    Member

    Apr 10, 2014
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    Here is a list of just some of the possibilities for an ARM based development kit, such as Arduino.

    There are also different types of these boards.

    The BeagleBone Black has 96 header I/O pins for any sort of breadboard/DIY gadgetry. It is also a great standalone Linux computer!

    Raspberry Pi is of course the leading competitor for this at the moment though. Here are some ambitious and fun projects people have put together with that!

    I think one of the main purposes of these development type boards is to simplify (as much as possible) the advanced circuitry behind the "Basics," so that people can start looking at more advanced combinations of technology.
     
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  3. KeepYourChinUp

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 18, 2014
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    Some pretty cool projects there :) Is the boards capability limited by the size of it? There doesn't look like much room to stick on some extra things if you wanted to. Take for example the recent Oculus Rift invention.

    Do you think they bought all the individual parts and soldered them to a board or do you think they invented their own parts? A circuit just has sooo much crap stuck to it, it looks extremely confusing as to what each little bit does. In fact when I build my old computer I actually knocked off a little square component and the computer still worked just fine without any issues for the next 5 years lol.
     
  4. timwhite

    Member

    Apr 10, 2014
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    I would say that the capability of a lot of technology is limited by its size, this being included. If they could make it smaller they would most likely. Things could be added on if they changed the shape of the board, but it is meant to be a bit of a "Bare bones" machine. I'm almost certain that they outsourced for all of their components, e.g. resistors, capacitors, etc. The processor may be the closest linked potentially custom part. Circuits may seem complex, but every bit of it serves a purpose. If you're interested, go ahead and read through some of the first few volumes of the All About Circuits textbook. It's all pretty interesting and really shows you how the little squares can all act in tandem to achieve very big, spherical things. As for that knocked off part, it could have been used for something you don't "activate" daily, like a circuit for a PCI slot you don't use.
     
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  5. KeepYourChinUp

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 18, 2014
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    Thanks. I'll check out that book. As you can probably guess by my limited number of posts on the forums I don't have much clue at all about anything electronic so very much just asking questions at the moment.

    Btw has anyone here build their own RC plane? As in designed the circuit themselves?
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2014
  6. timwhite

    Member

    Apr 10, 2014
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    Everybody starts somewhere. I'm sure some people around here have. I'm assuming you're talking about the radio control circuits? Or the on-board motor controllers or both? Just try a quick search on the forums.
     
  7. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    What can you do with any development board, not just an ARM board?

    I know what I have done with my development boards from all manufacturers.
     
  8. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
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    A college of mine uses his pi for a web server.
     
  9. nsaspook

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 27, 2009
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    One project I'm working on with a RPI is for a remote data client/panel array pointer for my solar project. The remote client currently runs on a Linux desktop computer with a DaqCard-700 for quick development but the plan is to host the software on the PI running a version of Linux raspbian with custom DAQ drivers for a PIC18 SPI slave for analog inputs, powered by a battery recharged by the panels at the remote location. The data is currently sent via a TCP socket to a PIC32 server that also serves web pages with information about the entire system but I hope to move it all to the PI when I'm done.

    DAQ card on the Desktop
    https://flic.kr/p/deDDcb

    RPI driver test hardware.
    https://flic.kr/p/dnNvd3

    Screen shot from the web server.
    https://raw.githubusercontent.com/nsaspook/mbmc/master/TCPIP Demo App/mbmc_screen_tcp.png

    A early version of the RPI DAQ driver is here.
    https://github.com/nsaspook/daq_gert

    If you're a casual uC programmer the learning curve on ARM at the hardware level can be steep but it's a huge amount of fun to see it all working.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2014
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