‘We Are Hungry!’

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by nsaspook, Sep 26, 2012.

  1. nsaspook

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 27, 2009
    2,912
    2,178
    Sparky49 likes this.
  2. Sparky49

    Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
    834
    417
    A few kids have been suspended from school for selling Snickers, Mars bars and Walkers over here.
     
  3. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
    2,428
    1,328
    Some new law went into effect in Vermont (and possibly the entire country) just recently. I don't want to turn this political, but I did hear it was the First Lady's idea. The school is only allowed to provide fruits and vegetables, and maybe (if the kids are lucky) a tiny slice of ham or cheese for a sandwich. My niece and nephew have started taking their own lunches due to the fact that they can't get a full, decent lunch from the school.

    Sure, fruits and vegetables are healthy and good for the kids, but they still need protein and unsaturated fats, ESPECIALLY at this point in their lives. If they're only served fruits and vegetables, and not enough proteins, they're going to become anemic and extremely unhealthy. Protein builds muscle and increases brain activity, and certain fats are necessary. If you ask me, this law needs to be repealed immediately--they're actually harming our kids, not helping them. It's a lot more than just "being hungry"! :mad:
     
  4. Georacer

    Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
    5,142
    1,266
    I don't know about the UK, but from what I hear, obesity and diabetes is a big problem over at the US.

    The changes on the menu are expected to be unappealing and it is natural for kids to refuse to eat many things, but is it a smart idea to try to criticize such a big effort?

    However, nsaspook, since you are the insider, tell us: Do you think that the portions are small and that your daughter is eating all the food that is served to her?

    To tell you my end of the deal, in Greece students don't eat at school, be it preliminary or highschool. The classes finish at ten to two tops and kids head home for lunch. That leaves their diet to the parents.
    Of course there is always a canteen that sells juices and small snacks, such as sandwiches, toasts and cheese pies. But that can hardly be called a meal.

    How many hours does school last over there?
     
  5. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
    2,428
    1,328
    You're absolutely right, Geo. Obesity is a huge problem over here. But starving the kids isn't the right way to fix it. Even if they ate all the fruits and vegetables that they were served, they would not be getting all the nutrients the human body requires. That is what the food pyramid is for--to show what a well-balanced meal looks like. You can't just pick one piece from it and serve only that food. This is my point--the schools should be required to serve well-rounded, healthy meals, according to the ENTIRE food pyramid. If they do so, the child will be getting what he or she really needs, and nothing more, nothing less.

    I understand the idea behind this law, but I can guarantee it won't work. And in the meantime, the healthy (non-obese) children are starving.
     
  6. Georacer

    Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
    5,142
    1,266
    That's why I am asking:

    • At which hours does school operate?
    • What do school lunches contain?
    • How much freedom are students given regarding their meals?
    • Do they usually eat again at home and is this intended?
    I think these questions can make or break a stable nutritional profile.
     
  7. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
    5,435
    1,305
    I don't think it will work. If the kid is hungry at school they will get a big calorie deficit as that is the time of day they expend the most calories.

    Then the instant they get home the kid wilkl pig out on pop tarts and half a packet of biscuits (cookies) etc, especially when so many kids get home before their parents get back from work.

    Good diet habits have to be slowly and consistently introduced, so just exposing the kids to a low calorie diet when they are at school will not work well, maybe even backfire and leave them with years of resentment and overeating to compensate.
     
    DerStrom8 likes this.
  8. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
    2,428
    1,328
    The schools here operate between 8:30-3 (for elementary) and 7:30-2 (for secondary).
    School lunches contain bread, lettuce, tomato, and as I mentioned before (if the kids are lucky) a slice of ham and a slice of cheese.
    They are not given much freedom, unless they bring their own meal
    They are not intended to eat again until dinnertime
     
  9. Georacer

    Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
    5,142
    1,266
    Then, I 'd say that, yes, this is not nutritional and filling at all. I find it hard to believe that these few things cost 2$ per person. It's not a meal, it's a 10 o'clock snack.

    Couple of months back I saw that "Jamie Oliver goes to US" series and the meals he introduced at that specific town were more than filling by my standards. Were those quantities ever given to the rest of the country and then got withdrawn?
     
  10. nsaspook

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 27, 2009
    2,912
    2,178
    My local data:
    Times: School starts at 7:45 to 2:15
    Menus: http://www.reynolds.k12.or.us/district/elementary-menus
    Choice: You can bag lunch or use the school lunch program.
    Other Meals: There is a small breakfast a school but we usually feed her at home instead.

    Our normal time for dinner is much later than the 2:30 when she arrives back from school and wants to play outside. We have an after school meal now just for her so she has the energy to ride the bike and run for a few hours while the weather is still nice.

    She's growing like a normal kids at 7 so the restriction in protein and calories at lunch in a non-overweight and healthy kid seems to be a overreaction to the obesity problem as I don't think the fat kids got that way from eating school lunches in the past.
     
    DerStrom8 likes this.
  11. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,163
    1,797
    I always "brown bagged" it to school. Do you really want to depend on a cash strapped school system in a community where nobody wants to pay taxes for your child's well being. Doesn't seem like smart parenting to me, but my kids are 34, 32, and 31. They take pretty good care of themselves now
     
  12. Georacer

    Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
    5,142
    1,266
    The link doesn't really tell much about the contents of the meal, just some reductions/additions. From your experience, what does it comprise of?

    I have no reason to doubt you that she doesn't eat enough at school. If it's a social standard for kids to eat only at school and not at home until dinner, it sounds very weird that the portions have become so small.

    edit: I found the .pdf describing the monthly menu. I see that lunch contains both meat and carbohydrates every day. If the materials are fresh, they are fine menus by my standards, even though they resemble fast-food too much for my tastes.
    It all boils down to the quantity, as I see it.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2012
  13. nsaspook

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 27, 2009
    2,912
    2,178
    It's not a question of money locally and we have plenty of fresh locally grown food but a decision was made to reduce the food intake of children at school for possibly good intentions that I think has missed the target completely.

    My other kids are all grown too but the little one is a blessing with a extra incentive to keep healthy. :)
     
  14. nsaspook

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 27, 2009
    2,912
    2,178
    The school has it's own kitchen so the food is fresh, not thawed and microwaved like in some larger districts here.
    It's portion size that's been limited and it's the same for K-5 so kids that are twice as big get the same amount as a 5yo. :confused:

    From the PDF
     
  15. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
    2,428
    1,328
    The school system in my town in VT does not have much fresh food, if any. It's almost all freeze-dried, shipped across the country, water is added, and things are thawed out and served as a "meal". The portions for the elementary kids (k-6) and the portions for the secondary kids (7-12) seem to be about the same. They system is severely flawed, and I really hope they fix it soon. I am not pleased with what they've started doing.
     
  16. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,163
    1,797
    I do not find this to be a credible statement. We spend more on education than any other developed country for 25th place among the world's students, but there is absolutely no more tax money to be had in a millage election to spend on teachers, books, and supplies let alone a sufficient hot lunch operation. This problem is not limited to Michigan it is nationwide.
     
  17. nsaspook

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 27, 2009
    2,912
    2,178
    I stand by my statement on the topic of the lunch program caloric limits. They were changed from a system of a floor limit where meals had to be this good or better to a system with a ceiling limit on food for reasons other than pure finances. What that agenda is and who is driving it is another topic that is political.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2012
  18. maxpower097

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2009
    795
    388
    In school our food always sucked horribly. Like a mental institution. So bad in middle school we used to order from take out/delivery places for lunch. Many times we'd all chip in and get 5 pizza's. In HS we had Pizza Hut, McDonalds and all that on campus but many times we'd still leave to go out for chineese or whatever. In HS they really didn't care about you coming and going.
     
  19. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
    1,584
    435
    I have to post here a post you guys failed to read. The school board

    system are taking,how would you say it.......out of country students

    8-12 with ,college garantee for $ 30,000.00 per student. They say our students

    are doing poorly....the students that are doing good are being teached in

    the U.S. and are working in the U.S.---.......I think its too late.

    Its every thing...plus your opinions. I just got some hacking marks on my type.
     
  20. Sparky49

    Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
    834
    417
Loading...