Wave soldering - components clearance

Discussion in 'Electronics Resources' started by viki2000, Oct 21, 2013.

  1. viki2000

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 18, 2013
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    Hi,

    I have a board with high density components.
    Altium designer have as default the components clearance (physical distance between components) as 10mils. In the same range 10-15mils, seems also in Orcad Cadence.

    Many documents on Internet from pcb designers/manufacturers recommend in case of wave soldering 50mils between components and worse case for some situation 30mils.

    What do you know about components clearance and wave soldering?

    I use mostly SMD components.
    I can hardly get 32mils between them, but that would be the maximum distance between them, otherwise will not fit on the board. And that is possible when many of the components are 0603.
    The process would be easier with 1206 sizes, but then I can have only 10-15mils max. clearance.
    The next problem would their orientation, because I cannot respect for all of them the recommended orientation preferred by the wave soldering.
    Any thoughts here? What might happen if I use small 0603 sizes and I orientate them not as recommended?

    Thanks for your opinions.
     
  2. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    Wave soldering SMD components will require that each component must be glued to the board. It is more common to use a reflow process. With components on only one side. Wave soldering of SMD components can be done but the steps needed will ad quite extra cost to the manufacturing process
     
  3. viki2000

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 18, 2013
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    0
    I am aware of all these things.
    I have to use wave soldering. It is not an option.
    That's why I asked the questions above about the components clearance.

    One thing is what the standards recommend:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MhtbYinHnQs

    (I looked through those standards)

    and another thing is the practical experience. Here I expect feedback from you.
     
  4. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    Very few people will have practical experience with wave soldering SMD here, because that is a dumb way to do it on a small scale, when you have better options like reflow ovens.

    Wave soldering SMD is mainly done on large "pro" style production runs, which is outside the hobby/mainstream experiences of most forum members.

    If you are going to take on an unusual pro technique with no experience, then you need to talk to your manufacturer, and find what clearances THEY recommend for THEIR wave soldering machine (and any other quirks their machinery has). :)
     
  5. viki2000

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 18, 2013
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    Yes, that is all about.
    I design a small board with not so many components, but very thight, with special constraints, almost as hobby, but I expect will be mass production where wave soldering is the imposed soldering method.
    I will try some other forums too.
    Any suggestions for other forums where questions about wave soldering may be proper asked?
     
  6. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    I suspect you would have better luck with a hot plate and hot nitrogen. I've never heard of a wave solder process for SMT, which doesn't mean much, being there are lots of things I've never heard of. I have had experience maintaining SMT lines (pick and place) and wave solderers though. I'm trying to visualize what all those tiny parts would do to the liquid solder.
     
  7. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    Hi Bill, wave soldering is normally done for through hole parts but they often mix in some SMD on the PCB too.

    The down side is that the SMD parts need to be glued down, so that requires a glue dot machine process before doing the pick and place.

    It's much more common to use all-SMD process and a reflow oven etc for smallish runs (up to a couple thousand PCBs).

    The O.P. seems to be designing something at a hobby level but expecting to use an unusual professional (large quantity) process.

    To the O.P; My suggestion is to TALK to your manufacturer, about their machinery and speed/clearance issues, long before finalising the PCB design.

    Designing the PCB first, then looking for a manufacturer, is a noobs way of working and is fine if you are making 100 PCBs with common SMD processes and large easy parts.
     
  8. Sensacell

    Well-Known Member

    Jun 19, 2012
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    Asking us will only lead you astray.

    Talk to the people that will actually do the job, everything else is guessing.
     
  9. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    That thought hit me to. I think the O.P should produce some working prototypes. And try to market this. You will in anyway have to team up with professional people regarding design, production, and maybe also some sort of approval. And you must assume a total redesign anyway. But anyway good luck with your project
     
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