Wave interference

Discussion in 'Math' started by boks, Nov 12, 2008.

  1. boks

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Oct 10, 2008
    218
    0
    If the amplitude of three intersecting waves is given by

    y(r,t) = \frac{A}{r}e^{i(kr-wt)}[1-2cos(kdsin\theta)]

    how can I then find the intensity at r = 200 m as a function of \theta?

    I know that intensity is the square of the amplitude. Should I simply square y(r,t)? If I do, I get I as a function of t as well, because of the part e^{i(kr-wt)}.
     
  2. mik3

    Senior Member

    Feb 4, 2008
    4,846
    63
    If the waves have the same frequency then ωt=θ

    Transform the exponential term into a polar representation (cos(x)+jsin(x)) and then find the modulus (amplitude) of the resulting complex number.
     
  3. KL7AJ

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 4, 2008
    2,040
    287
    Analytic signals are SO much simpler to deal with, aren't they? :)


    Eric
     
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