Wau

Discussion in 'Math' started by Sparky49, Mar 8, 2012.

  1. Sparky49

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
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    Hi everyone,

    continuing in a similar fashion to my previous maths post :))) could somebody explain in layman's terms what 'wau' is.

    I can across it today and have seen some of the cool stuff it can do, I thought 'wow'.:p

    But what is wau? And why does it makes us go 'wow'?

    Sparky
     
  2. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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    Last edited: Mar 8, 2012
  3. Sparky49

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
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    That was the video I saw.

    Wau, a greek letter which looks like an F.

    Whilst that video is great to show what wau can do, it doesn't explain what wau is.

    Wikipedia's definition makes my head implode.:eek:
     
  4. bertus

    Administrator

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  5. Georacer

    Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
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    It is indeed an ancient Greek letter, not used anymore. It is called digamma, as bertus said. I don't know why the girl in the video calls it wau.
     
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  6. steveb

    Senior Member

    Jul 3, 2008
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    wau is one !

    The video is an educational practical joke.
     
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  7. 1chance

    Member

    Nov 26, 2011
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    That's my gut feeling as well, even though I'm the one that always falls for the NPR April Fools jokes.:confused:
     
  8. steveb

    Senior Member

    Jul 3, 2008
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    It is a well done video, and it is creative and educational. The importance of unity is often overlooked. It is a very special number.

    The give away for me was when they mentioned wau is equal to exp(2 pi i). Before that point, I wasn't really thinking too deeply because of the speed of the presentation. Then they related it to physics (E=mc^2) which was a huge red flag. Then, I went back (slowly) to every example given and wau=1 works for all cases.

    Yes, those will be happening soon, and we get some here at AAC too, so watch out. :)
     
  9. studiot

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 9, 2007
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    For those who find mathematical purity too dry but like the link between maths and physics get hold of a copy of

    The Mathematical Mechanic

    by Mark Levi

    It is fascinating to see his derivation of maths from the basic physics of things

    eg

    He proves pythagoras by whirling a triangular fish tank around vertex and derives the Gauss-Bonnet theorem from a bicycle wheel.
     
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