Water on Mars?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by tracecom, Sep 28, 2015.

  1. tracecom

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 16, 2010
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    The scientists at NASA seem pretty sure that there is liquid water on Mars, but they don't seem quite as certain as the scientists that have said since I was a kid that any water that was ever on Mars dried up billions of years ago.

    Who to believe?
     
  2. joeyd999

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    Jun 6, 2011
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    Supposedly, the water is contaminated with salts to the extent that it stays liquid well below freezing (someone want to research the saturation temperature at 500 Pa?).

    Therefore, the EPA obviously had something to do with it.
     
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  3. dannyf

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 13, 2015
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    I don't suppose that the NASA scientists today are saint enough not to be swayed by their desires for more funding and job security? :)

    Seriously, it is exciting to see that water may exist somewhere else, especially on Mars. On the flip side, it seems to be such an inhabitable planet. Europa seems to be more promising for human colonization.
     
  4. nsaspook

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    Aug 27, 2009
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    What's the big deal?

    [​IMG]
     
  5. boatsman

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    Jan 17, 2008
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    Seriously, it is exciting to see that water may exist somewhere else, especially on Mars. On the flip side, it seems to be such an inhabitable planet. Europa seems to be more promising for human colonization.[/QUOTE] So many people from the Middle East seem to think so!
     
  6. dannyf

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    Sep 13, 2015
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    I don't know: they seem to be marching towards Germany rather than the Mars.
     
  7. Kermit2

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    Feb 5, 2010
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    With no magnetic field to stop solar radiation why not just get a few dozen whole body Xrays every year and enjoy the benefits of life on Mars right here on Earth.
    Your commute to work would be shorter as well. :)
     
  8. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    Its like 2008 (Phoenix Mars Lander) and 2003 (Mars Curiosity) all over again..
    Old news... yawn...

    Dear Space People,
    We don't care....
    The amount of money you have spent to tell us there is frozen salt water could have feed millions of starving people..
    But go ahead.. Spend Billions more to put a few sad soles in glass houses on a planet without any real life forms or Kate Upton :)
     
  9. joeyd999

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    No, that would be "liquid running salt water". Big diff.
     
  10. mcgyvr

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    Just depends on the seasons I thought.. Its frozen during winter then not during summer..
    But again.. I could care less so details aren't important..
     
  11. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    Water per se isn't so interesting. It's the implication that the odds for finding life go up dramatically with the finding of liquid water. I hear it's full of chlorates and perchlorate. That might be good for rocket fuel but I'm not sure much Earth life as we know it would be expected in such a soup. But then we wouldn't have predicted all those vent organisms on the ocean floor either.
     
  12. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    There are a lot of other environments that support life on Earth that seem unlikely on the face of it. The extra cold waters of the arctic come to mind, where a lot of organisms have evolved their own version of anti-freeze.
     
  13. joeyd999

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    Yup. @tcmtech's wife comes to mind... :D
     
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  14. Glenn Holland

    Member

    Dec 26, 2014
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    On a related subject, I remember NASA found a rock on the Earth which supposedly came from Mars. Just how it got from Mars to the Earth is somewhat obscure and some theorize an asteroid hit the planet and knocked a huge chunk loose and into free space.

    However, my personal theory it that a volcanic explosion could have been another cause. The escape velocity of Mars is less than 1/2 that of Earth and a volcanic blast could have provided the energy to completely expel the rock. in prehistoric times, there have been some very severe volcanic explosions on the Earth and an equivalent explosion on Mars would have easily sent debris into interplanetary space.

    Also, the Martian rock found on Earth is "mafic basaltic" (a magnesium-iron composition) which causes the red tint to the surface of Mars.

    That's my 2 Cents. :)
     
  15. djsfantasi

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    Apr 11, 2010
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    Groan! Such a "Dad Joke".
     
  16. loosewire

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    Apr 25, 2008
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    Look at all the water I found,I'm on the N.E. orbit of the cloud.

    @ joey,..will mars accept your image,will you have to make adjustments.
     
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