WAECO CoolFreeze CDF 25

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by mh_psaxneis, Dec 23, 2013.

  1. mh_psaxneis

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 23, 2013
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    Hello guys
    I want to buy this device

    http://marine.dometicgroup.com/en/products/compressor_coolers_481.php

    for solar use.

    And i cannot tell what power usage in watts per hour it has...
    can you please explain to me those details?

    0.44 Ah/h at +20°C ambient temperature,
    0.67 Ah/h at +32°C ambient temperature,
    both at +5°C interior temperature

    any comment for the waeco products or other suggestions will be very usefull

    THANK YOU
     
  2. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,343
    6,828
    Amps times volts is watts.
    .67 amps x 24V is 16 watts.
    Still, the specifications are pretty vague. They sell 100 watt power supplies for this, and that is a long way from 16 watts. I assume it would use more current during start-up because the inside is warm and any compressor motor will have a start surge. It isn't really possible to compute the start up requirements from what is given.
     
  3. mh_psaxneis

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 23, 2013
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    Thanks for the answer #12

    How you know that is 0.67 x 24v and not 0.67 x 12v? it say that it works with 12v and 24v,

    it maby a stupid question but it will helps me understand...

    Refrigerators are not working continuously, but in periods, so maybe it uses close to 100W power for a short period of time, or maybe it's a scam.

    I have find it with 475E
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2013
  4. debe

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2010
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    Most of the small Waeco fridges use a Danfoss BD35 24v/12v compressor, heres the data of one. They are a brushless DC compressor & are soft start (start current is not mutch more than run current)
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2013
  5. debe

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2010
    947
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    I have 3 waeco fridges & im quite happy with there performance using the BD35 compressor. Ive found my 12V 100Watt solar system only just keeps up with my CDF 40 fridge over a 24hr period & that is on a full day of sun. The fridge draws 3.2Amps on 12v when running.
     
    #12 likes this.
  6. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,343
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    I don't. That's why I gave you the math formula.

    Debe is paying 38.4 watts to run his. That is nothing like the alleged specifications which indicate 16 watts maximum. There is just too much missing or wrong in the page you pointed to. The Danfoss pages seem a lot more realistic, but even at that, they are a bit difficult to read. So much information stuffed in such a small space, and how is a person to know what RPM the motor is running.:confused:
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2013
  7. debe

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2010
    947
    184
    This is there mains power supply.
     
  8. debe

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2010
    947
    184
    Not quite sure what your aim is. Generaly when running these fridges on a solar system you need a deep cycle battery to keep the fridge running during cloudy conditions & at night. The amount of power consumed & running times are all dependent on ambient temperature & whether it going to be used as a Fridge or Freezer. The CDF fridge compressor to draw 3.2Amps is fixed speed of 2500RPM. Most times the power consumption is interpreted as Amp/hrs (comp consuming 3.2Amps per hour) as this is going to be related as to how big a battery is going to be used. Worst case is running 24Hrs @ 3.2A will be 76.8Amp/Hr consumed. So in the available amount of sunlight the Solar panels will need to be big enough to replace at least 80Amp/Hr allowing for some inefficiency in charging.
     
  9. mh_psaxneis

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 23, 2013
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    i'm not sure if I understand well, check what I'm saying please..

    if when it runs needs 38.4 Watts, and lets say it runs 30 mins (in the hot summer) per hour in periods, it makes as ~ 19 watts per hour. which is ok...

    and if it runs 15 mins (more likely, except the summer) per hour in periods it makes as 38.4/4 = ~9 watts per hour, which is great...

    However guys look what i notice,
    there is two types of this device:

    WAECO CDF-25
    http://www.getawaeco.com.au/index.php?com=com_products&category=5398&action=view&itemid=123

    and

    WAECO CF-25VERA
    http://www.getawaeco.com.au/index.php?com=com_products&category=5398&action=view&itemid=38

    and they have different consumption details, and looks like different control panels... (I only care for the consumption) but i starting to be disappointed by waeco while they give variable details in every page for same devices and not answer in mails...
    The ''vera'' version is not even in the main page of waeco in the products list...

    can you guys figure out the differences of those 2 devices?
     
  10. debe

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2010
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    The Waeco Cf-25VERA is totally different in the motor control, It varies the compressor speed automaticly. It starts at a high speed (more current draw) until it gets near required temp, then runs at a slower speed (lower current draw). This unit is microprocessor controlled.
     
  11. debe

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2010
    947
    184
    CDF-25 the compressor is fixed at one speed & doesn't use microprocessor. Heres the circuit of a CDF-40 same compressor.
     
  12. mh_psaxneis

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 23, 2013
    6
    0
    I bought the cdf-25 finally (the simple one, not the vera)
    I plugged it to a waeco transformer for 240V grid,
    I plugged the transformer to a wattmeter...
    and the wattmeter to the wall.....

    when the motor is working the wattmeter gives a usage of 60-70 W at the moment (not per hour)

    the good thing is that is working rarely and for short periods...

    @debe but still, that you said about 38 watt/h when is working, is incorrect... is about 30W more....

    may my waeco has a different motor... am I that unlucky? or the transformer between the wattmeter and the refrigerator increases the watt usage that much?

    you think this

    http://www.getawaeco.com.au/index.php?com=com_products&action=view&itemid=47

    will make any difference in the watt/h usage?


    anyway if i didn't bought something, was no way to know... i'm not that disappointed about it, but looks like it needs bigger solar then i was planning....

    thanks for the answers guys
     
  13. debe

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2010
    947
    184
    If its a realy cheep Waeco, it may not have a Danfoss compressor (Which mine has). If it has a Chinese compressor (Wanbao) they draw more power. Check the compliance plate on the fridge. Mine is 35W & that's what it draws. For a true current draw, measure it on the fridge side of the powersupply as there is some inefficiencies if you are measuring on the 240v side.
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2014
  14. mh_psaxneis

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 23, 2013
    6
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    it wasn't cheap at all, 500E it's well paid...

    to check the plate i must remove the cover on the side i believe.... i will respond... but do waeco has two qualities of products? and if yes... why they do not say it clearly?
     
  15. mh_psaxneis

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 23, 2013
    6
    0
    I remove the cover and at the motor say:

    wancool r134a dc motor LBP
    guangzhou wanbao UCT compresor co ltd

    acv 20 dc
    for controler
    roHS


    Tell me at least that it's made by waeco and it's not some monkey!
     
  16. debe

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2010
    947
    184
    The one you have is the Chinese compressor & in my opinion not as good as the Danfoss compressor in power consumption. Generaly the Waeco fridges that have the Chinese compressor are cheeper & warranty period is mutch shorter. The slower the compressor is run, the lower the current draw. There is not as mutch information available for the Chinese compressor as there is for the Danfoss.
     
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