Voltage, Watt, Current.... Resistance?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by cheddy, Nov 1, 2007.

  1. cheddy

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Oct 19, 2007
    87
    0
    Hey i'm just exploring the interdependency of electronic values please explain to me if my logic is correct here.

    Let's say we have a power supply that supplies 12V and 100W.

    P=E*I
    100W=12V*I
    I=8.3A

    So another way to state 12V, 100W is that it's 12V 8.6A.

    E=I*R
    12V=8.3A*R
    R=1.45ohm

    Another way would be to say that the power supply can supply 12V just as long as the parallel power distribution resistance exceed 1.45ohms?
     
  2. John Luciani

    Active Member

    Apr 3, 2007
    477
    0
    A better way to say it would be that the power supply can deliver 12V with a maximum
    current of 8.3A.

    When determing whether a power supply is suitable for an application it is usually
    more convenient to use volts and amps rather than volts and ohms.

    (* jcl *)
     
  3. cheddy

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Oct 19, 2007
    87
    0
    I agree completely.
     
  4. Salgat

    Active Member

    Dec 23, 2006
    215
    1
    Isn't Ohms law beautifully simple?
     
  5. recca02

    Senior Member

    Apr 2, 2007
    1,211
    0
    specification of current and voltage removes ambiguities since m/c may draw more current for a given power due to diff pf.
     
Loading...