Voltage Transducer with AC Output

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Dawud Beale, Jul 1, 2015.

  1. Dawud Beale

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 10, 2012
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    Hi, I am looking for a voltage transducer but they all seem to give RMS outputs. I am looking to produce a sine wave in labview from an AC mains input. Can anyone suggest anything or give feedback on how to find it without bringing up the RMS DC output transducers?
     
  2. Alec_t

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 17, 2013
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    What you're looking for is called a "transformer" ;).
     
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  3. AnalogKid

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 1, 2013
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    A transducer is a physical device. Labview is a software program. I don't understand your question.

    ak
     
  4. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    Are you looking for something like an LVDT?
    Max.
     
  5. cmartinez

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 17, 2007
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    If I understood your question correctly... then I believe that Alec_t has given the right answer is post #2
     
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  6. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    All sine waves have an RMS value like all empty boxes have cubic inches. It's merely a way to describe them.
     
  7. cmartinez

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 17, 2007
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    Yeah, I know... but I'm under the impression that the OP wants to see the mains sine wave in labview. For that, he'd need a transformer to scale down the voltage so it can be within the range of whatever probes or instrument he's planning to use to interface to labview
     
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  8. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Did you think I was talking to you? I was not. I was explaining to the TS why all transducers of sine waves have an RMS description.
     
  9. cmartinez

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    Jan 17, 2007
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    oh... :confused:
     
  10. Dawud Beale

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 10, 2012
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    Hi guys, yes transformer did the trick. Thanks. Just to clarify, I am indeed looking to see a sin wave in lab view.

    Follow up question.

    If I am monitoring three phases of a three phase system, is each individual phase 230V?

    I understand that 3 phase systems are 415V but I am not sure how 3 lots of 230V give you 415V.

    To monitor each phase, do I need use a 230V rated transformer or a 415V transformer?

    What I don't understand, usually you only get voltage superposition when positive and negative terminals are connected together. If two positive terminals or two negative terminals are connected, you usually increase the available current draw rather than superimpose the voltages. Thats with DC. So how is 3 times 230V giving us 415V?
     
  11. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    ten characters.
     
  12. Dawud Beale

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 10, 2012
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    So does it depend on the type of transformer? Is that the transformer within some equipment being powered by three phase or transformer that is part of the grid infrastructure external to the building?
     
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