Voltage regulator -wind turbine

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Jhon jhonni, Sep 15, 2015.

  1. Jhon jhonni

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 15, 2015
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    Hello , please can you help me to build a simple circuit to regulate voltage 12 to 15v .. i need this circuit to hooking up it with wind turbine . the output of the generator does not exceed 20v . sorry my english is not so good .. thanks
     
  2. ronv

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 12, 2008
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    How much current can your turbine put out?
    Are you charging batteries? If so what kind?
     
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  3. Jhon jhonni

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 15, 2015
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    the current about 5 amp .. yes i use it to charge calsium battery 100ah
     
  4. Jhon jhonni

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 15, 2015
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    Sorry 7 amp not 5.. I am using an electric bike motor as generator
     
  5. ronv

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    Nov 12, 2008
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    I think I would be tempted to charge it kind of like in a car, where you just turn the charger on and off.
    Do you need to worry about it spinning to fast when the battery is fully charged?
     
  6. InspectorGadget

    Active Member

    Nov 5, 2010
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    If you only want it to work when the wind is high and the generator output is above the target voltage, then you can use a simple step-down converter. If you want the same output to be provided when the generator voltage drops below the output range, say, down to 10V or so, then you need a buck/boost or SEPIC converter.

    So if you only need step-down conversion (works only when wind generator output >= 15V) you could use one of these step-down converters, and then add an appropriate charger for your battery. This step down converter from Amazon handles 10A and works up to 30V input, and has an adjustable output.

    http://www.amazon.com/JBtek-Regulator-Application-Transformers-Adjustable/dp/B00Y7J09DS

    [​IMG]
     
  7. InspectorGadget

    Active Member

    Nov 5, 2010
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    I assume you mean a "calcium" battery. Is this like a 12V car battery?

    Once you step down the generator voltage to, say, 13V (using the converter above), you can use an RV towed-battery charger to charge the battery. This lets you charge 12V-to-12V. (Otherwise you would need an inverter to go to 110V and a normal car battery charger that ran off of 110V, and the energy loss in all the conversions would waste a lot of your power.)

    http://www.amazon.com/Rvibrake-Towed-Battery-Charger-TBC-12014/dp/B00YCXSK58

    http://www.rvibrake.com/Towed-Battery-Charger-p/tbc-12014.htm

    [​IMG]
     
  8. InspectorGadget

    Active Member

    Nov 5, 2010
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    Just be sure to adjust your step-down converter output regulated voltage to that of a standard car battery, say, 12.6V, so it'll be what the Towed Battery Charger expects as an input. The Towed Battery Charger handles up to 15A so it should be perfect for your application.
     
  9. Jhon jhonni

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 15, 2015
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    mmm.. is the car voltage regulator useful ?i have one.. But i don't know how to connect it with the other components ! .. it's final step in my project
     
  10. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    A voltage regulator is useful for charging a lead-acid battery because you can use a peak-voltage strategy with that chemistry. You don't have to worry about limiting current because a battery that large can take the full output of that generator (I think, based on the spotty details we have seen so far).

    Most other rechargeable battery chemistries you see these days cannot be charged safely using just a peak-voltage strategy, and you need a charge controller to do it right. Depending on the specs of the charge controller, it might handle as input anything that the generator puts out. A one-step solution.
     
  11. InspectorGadget

    Active Member

    Nov 5, 2010
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    The charge controller pictured probably has a limited input voltage range; in fact, it's probably dependent on having exact lead-chemistry battery voltage (12.6V exactly) on the input. You may be able to find one that adapts, but it'll probably do that with a buck regulator on the front end. You could make an intelligent buck regulator under microprocessor control to monitor the charge level and charge time and switch to a current-limited mode by adjusting the setpoint until the desired current was achieved. That's a pretty big project with some advanced principles involved and current sensing feedback.

    I made the off-the-shelf suggestions because they're easy to get and relatively inexpensive. The front-end step-down regulator is only $11. And I liked the feature on the battery charger of "when the battery is full it goes into maintenance mode." Not knowing exactly what that is, it has to be some kind of current-limited trickle mode.
     
  12. ronv

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 12, 2008
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    If you want to build one here is a simple one.
    Since your turbine can't exceed the maximum charge current for a 100 AH battery I think you can just charge it until it reaches 14.4 volts then shut it off, When it discharges below 12 volts (with or without load) you can charge it.
     
  13. nsaspook

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 27, 2009
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    I would just add you want to Bulk current charge it to the Absorption charge voltage that's recommended (~14.4) and then hold that voltage until the current draw drops to the needed level (end-amps) for a full charge. For Lead-Acid chemistry this step is very important for full capacity during the entire cycle life of the battery in a RE application.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2015
  14. InspectorGadget

    Active Member

    Nov 5, 2010
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    Hopefully, this is what the commercial charger module does, calling the float mode "maintenance mode".
     
  15. kc5133

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    Feb 14, 2011
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  16. InspectorGadget

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    Nov 5, 2010
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    This technique eliminates the Absorption Charge and Float Charge periods. Slamming the battery between Bulk Charge and open-circuit self-discharge will decrease the life of the battery. Maintaining proper voltages and using a three-phase charger will extend the life of the battery.
     
  17. nsaspook

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    All but the cheapest have a three stage charging profile for LA batteries. On some you can adjust the end-amps setting for when to go into float "maintenance mode" but on some like the old C40 charge controller it's a fixed setting of 1 hour. That's easy to fix if you have a circuit that monitors the float led indicator. Simply reset the C40 and it will go right back into Absorption charge in a few seconds for another hour if needed.
     
  18. InspectorGadget

    Active Member

    Nov 5, 2010
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    That solar regulator with the LM117 and PB137 won't handle the current. It only handles about 1A and he needs at least 5A. Plus it offers no improvement over the other techniques, and would generate a lot of heat.
     
  19. InspectorGadget

    Active Member

    Nov 5, 2010
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    Right. Have you ever found a good, 3-phase charge controller that would run from another 12V source (or any DC source)? I haven't found one. All the ones I've seen plug into 110V mains.
     
  20. nsaspook

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    The old Xantrex C40 will work but the supplied voltage should be at least 15vdc for proper three-stage charging.
     
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