Voltage and configuration of Milling Machine

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Dawud Beale, Jul 9, 2015.

  1. Dawud Beale

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 10, 2012
    275
    7
    Hi everyone.

    I was wondering what the configuration (star or delta) of the following machine is likely to be:

    http://www.wardcnc.com/product/22/200/hcmc-series.html

    If I was to attach a voltage transformer to the cable that supplies power to the spindle, would a 230V transformer be ok as I am only monitoring one phase, or do they some how super impose?
     
  2. Reloadron

    Active Member

    Jan 15, 2015
    963
    232
    Depends on the machine. Most are 3 phase which here in the US can be 240 VAC 60 Hz. or 480 VAC 60 Hz. Call the vendor and see how it is wired and what voltage options it offers. You need to find out the exact power requirements and look at what you have available, including current. You linked to a fairly large machine. Finally you do not mention location but in the US the NEC dictates grounding rules and disconnect rules.

    Ron
     
  3. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,771
    929
    a quick look shows a power range of 15-26 kilowatts. This would be a question you should submit to that manufacturer.
     
  4. Dawud Beale

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 10, 2012
    275
    7
    Its based in the UK, but the machine is originally from Taiwan. If it is 240V on each phase, can it superimpose to have a higher voltage accross phases? If I just have 3 transformers connecting each phase to neutral, will a 240V transformer suffice?

    Are the 415V 3 phase supplies being stepped down to that value from the grid? I.e. does it use a different transformer to the 230V transformers? I thought it was a result of superposition of multiple 230V phases
     
  5. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,507
    2,367
    You don't mention if this is a residence or industrial location.
    In the UK your 1ph is 240v from one phase and star neutral, the transformer is 415 3ph.
    If a residence, you do not have much option for a machine of that size, the spindle and any other motors/pumps are likely 3 ph also.
    The machine can usually be fed from either a star or delta Tfmr as 3ph and Gnd is usually all that is needed.
    Max.
     
  6. Reloadron

    Active Member

    Jan 15, 2015
    963
    232
    Most systems I have worked with in the US were 480 VAC Delta configured. Do you know if this machine is configured for Delta or WYE power?

    One more time, you are going to need to either contact the manufacturer or if this machine is in your possession check the name plate data on the machine, including the spindle motor and see how it's configured. Should a transformer be required you can't even begin to guess what you need without knowing how the system is configured.

    First, I haven't a clue what power you have available as to Voltage and Current, Delta or WYE and next I haven't a clue how your machine is configured? Yes, in a simple word yes, transformers can be used or a single simple 3 phase transformer but you need to know your requirements for what you have.

    Ron
     
  7. Dawud Beale

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 10, 2012
    275
    7
    Its an industrial location with three phase power source.

    I contacted the manufacturers and they are in Taiwan and told me to email them. I did, and never heard back.

    So is the star-delta thing a transformer BEFORE the motor or is the motor itself wired up in one of those two configurations?
     
  8. Reloadron

    Active Member

    Jan 15, 2015
    963
    232
    Here is what I would do. Wait till you have this unit. The unit will have a nameplate and the nameplate should have all the make & model as well as power requirements. Here in the US (I can't speak for your location) industrial power can be delivered in a few voltages and flavors or configurations. There is "Delta" and there is "WYE". I could go in depth using lines of text explaining the two but a simple Google of Delta verses WYE power should give you some ideas of the two.

    Transformers are just a way to get from what you have to what you need. I could have for example 480 VAC 60 Hz 3 Phase Delta and a system that requires 480 Volt 3 Phase WYE or 240 Volt 3 phase WYE and use a transformer system to get where I need to be. The size and voltages being determined by what I have and the load I need to support. Without knowing the load and voltages I really can't get beyond that. Loads are frequently rated in KVA (Thousands of Volts times Amps).

    Yes, the transformer(s) go between your power source and your load (machine or system). Transformers are not always required as it depends on what you need versus what you have.

    Ron
     
  9. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
    4,769
    969
    Register on their site.. get the technical documentation for the machine and then call an electrician for a quote and give them the documentation.
    You shouldn't be doing the electrical work.
     
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