Voltage across a capacitor

Discussion in 'Homework Help' started by kduubyah, Nov 17, 2009.

  1. kduubyah

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 15, 2009
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    If there is no current through a capacitor is the voltage drop zero?
     
  2. t_n_k

    AAC Fanatic!

    Mar 6, 2009
    5,448
    782
    Not necessarily - a charged capacitor will hold charge (and thereby have a potential difference across its terminals) even if isolated or disconnected from the circuit which initially provided the charge to it.
     
  3. JDT

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 12, 2009
    658
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    Or to put it another way: Current will only flow "through" a capacitor when the voltage across its plates is changing.

    Actually, the current does not flow through, it charges (or discharges) the capacitor.
     
  4. Ratch

    New Member

    Mar 20, 2007
    1,068
    3
    kduubyah,

    Current never exists through a capacitor, unless it is leaky. Current exists up to one plate of a capacitor, and it exists away from the opposite plate, but never through the capacitor. It does this by accumulating charge on one plate, and depleting charge on the opposite plate. This causes a charge imbalance to form, thereby causing a voltage difference between the capacitor plates.

    JDT,

    Charge never flows and current never exists through a capacitor under any circumstances unless it is leaky. See ahove

    Ratch
     
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