Voice Doubling Mic

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by OokamiNora, May 12, 2011.

  1. OokamiNora

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 12, 2011
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    Hi Guys, I am new to Circuitry, and i have a project i was trying to make for a convention that i am probably going to go to, but i need help with the circuitry.
    The plan is, i am going as a vocaloid (a computer voice portraying a real person) in this case a singer, but when i go onstage to sing the song, or talk in the crowd, i want my voice to sound a little more like a computer, well more like my voice has a delay circuit so it sounds like there are 2 of me talking at the same time, perferably 2 nanoseconds apart or so, causing it to sound like theres 2 voices coming from one person.
    Anyone have any ideas for a circuit for it?
    perferably i would like it to attach between the mic and cord or cord and mixer.
    The help is most apreciated
     
  2. kubeek

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 20, 2005
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    2ns? Then use two cables, where the second one is one foot longer. :D
    Other than that, to do any delay you need some memory medium. In the old times it was an infinite loop in a cassete player with two or more playback heads at different positions.
    In the modern days you need A/D converter, some signal processor with enough RAM to hold the delay and a D/A. Much easier to buy some guitar pedal that has delay in it.
     
  3. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    Gosh, this sounds like you need simple reverb, which "echoes" the signal a few milliseconds after the main. (Nobody could detect a nanosecond delay, as this is far less than a single cycle of the sound.)

    Reverb is provided by a wide range of audio amps or effects units.
     
  4. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    The speed of light in 1ns travels 9". You mean milliseconds, otherwise you will never notice the difference. Say 10ms apart. Google bucket brigade chip.
     
  5. KMoffett

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 19, 2007
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    Bill,

    Where can you get those now? I haven't seen any for sale for many years.

    Ken
     
  6. Wendy

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    Mar 24, 2008
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  7. rogs

    Active Member

    Aug 28, 2009
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    The problem with bucket brigade chips (apart from the price, if you can find any these days!) is that they were noisy. Great fun, but noisy!

    Edit: I didn't read Bill's post link - sorry. They are available cheaply again then. Still noisy though....

    Doing it digitally is probably the best way these days, but for a 'one off' the cheapest way is probably to buy a device complete.
    Something like this perhaps: http://www.behringer.com/EN/Products/DSP110.aspx
     
  8. soundman

    New Member

    Dec 27, 2010
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    I would just go to a music store if you need something in a hurry that will do the job for you, but you may have to spend a little bit. Ask for a small in-line effects pedal that produces one or more harmonics at the same time to get the computer voice effect. I'm not sure that you will be satisfied with delay only.
     
  9. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    There was an audio delay project using computer RAM someone posted awhile back, but it would be a bit too complex for a "circuit n00b" to attempt building, and obtaining some of the parts could be a problem.

    You'd be best off going to a music store, and trying out some special effects units yourself; that way you can hear what you'll be buying - and it'll be working the same day you buy it.
     
  10. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    The OP connected a time delay with the sound he is seeking, but I think that might just be an assumption. It'd be better to first run the through all the "standard" effects already available in any music store. Personally, I'd do it in software such as Native Instruments Guitar Rig or even Apple's GarageBand, with the appropriate effects plugins.
     
  11. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    Maybe you could try one of those amplitude modulated "cylon" or "dalek" voice kits, they are extremely simple and cheap and avaiable from most hobby kit stores.

    Depending on the depth and freq of the modulation you adjust you might get a decent "I am a computer!" voice out of it.
     
  12. OokamiNora

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 12, 2011
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    ok when i said nanosecond, i was being a little exageratory, i know it would be too fast for people to hear, more like 1/100 of a second maybe 1/100 of a second(milisecond), but i eas thinking something comprized of a direct line and a split off that which would comprize of a 555 timer circuit and a potentiometer that would be able to change the speed that the sound whic was split could be "recorded" then played back and jump in with the same wire about 1/100-1/1000 of a second after the first one came through to make that second voice. Now i dont have the schematic with me right now for the 555 Timer IC but i can get that soon, but this is a simple drawing (extremely simple) of how the circuit should work/look (looks are completely off since i have only used 3 leads of the 555) i hopefully will get it to beable to be attatched with the mic on or next to my ear, although i would need to also place a battery in it to help it work... my DC work isnt that good
    [​IMG] If you cant see the picture then you can click the link and it will take you to it
    http://s1115.photobucket.com/albums/k559/ookaminora/?action=view&current=mic.jpg
     
  13. kubeek

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 20, 2005
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    Not gonna happen. You need that bucket brigade chip, a dsp processor, or a tape machine to do any significant delay. 555 is nowhere near enough to do the job, a thousand of them maybe :D
    Or just buy some guitar effect.
     
  14. OokamiNora

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 12, 2011
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    Ok. I'll look into it! Thanks for the help.
     
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