Vintage electronics - Old Time Clock machine - where to start ?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Todd W. Roat, Jun 7, 2015.

  1. Todd W. Roat

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 7, 2015
    21
    2
    So I bought this old Cincinnati Manufacturing circa 1950 time clock machine. Really just bought it for the Cincinnate referenc e(Im in Cincy) and because it was just kind cool.

    When I took it apart all the mechanicals for the clock and other mechanisms were still it very good shape. So I began wondering if, with electricity, the machine could be used as a clock.

    I don't know that much about electricity other than basic wiring (home, motorcycle, etc). While the electronics in here look basic there a couple components I don't recognize. See pix. Esp. the cloth wrapped components in last image.

    So basic questions:

    1. Should I even try ;^)
    2. Little afraid to just plug it in. Way to test it with voltmeter first?
    3. Any and all input welcome.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Brevor

    Active Member

    Apr 9, 2011
    279
    54
    From the photos you posted it looks like all it needs is a new power cord. Maybe use a precision oiler to lubricate the moving parts with some machine oil.
     
  3. dl324

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 30, 2015
    3,242
    619
    Last picture looks like a transformer. A picture of the tag on the bottom would give more clues.

    Be mindful of polarity when you rewire.
     
  4. AnalogKid

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 1, 2013
    4,531
    1,248
    Or is the last photo the motor; I see only one coil with only two wires. Most of the insulation on just about everything looks shot, but there are no obvious shorts in the photos. If you start to remove electrical parts, be prepared for a lot of that insulation to crumble away.

    ak
     
  5. Lestraveled

    Well-Known Member

    May 19, 2014
    1,957
    1,215
    If you have an ohm meter, measure the resistance across the power plug. If it reads less than 10 ohms then there is probably a problem. Over 50 ohms and I would plug it in and go for it.
     
    cmartinez likes this.
  6. Bernard

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 7, 2008
    4,172
    397
    Laminations could be a rotary solenoid. More pictures please.
     
  7. AnalogKid

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 1, 2013
    4,531
    1,248
    Could be, but it's a time clock. Think horses...
     
  8. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
    2,781
    1,229
    1) IMO absolutely!:)
    2) And well you should be... considering the condition of the power cord!:eek:
    3) OK then! Here goes...:D

    FWIW: The laminated device in the 'last' image appears to be a 'skeleton-style' shaded pole motor -- and, in fact, upon 'zooming in' one can barely descry the word 'motor' on the nameplate.

    When you restore the unit you will need to replace the power cord, dissemble, clean and lubricate the motor, clean any electrical (switch) contacts (which, if present, will likely take the form of linkage-actuated switch-reads bound near one end with Bakelite (i.e. phenolic) insulation --- of course the mechanical components may likewise require cleaning/lubrication...

    Finally -- prior to connecting the unit to the mains, please check for line to chassis leakage!!! --- In any event it is advisable to consider grounding the chassis (Via a three conductor power cord)

    Best regards and good luck!
    HP:)
     
  9. Todd W. Roat

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 7, 2015
    21
    2
    Thanks for all the input. Will try to get some more pix, although the rest is all mechanical not electrical. Here is a picture of the "Motor":

    [​IMG]

    I would also like to try and replace that old two prong plug with a vintage one, but cant find anything like it online. The prongs have an odd pattern (spring type?) to them. Picture 2.

    What gauge would you guess that to be in the power cord?
     
  10. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
    2,781
    1,229
    A 16 AWG (stranded) cord should 'fit the bill' --- If you will not be 'upgrading' to a grounded power cord/connection please consider operating the unit only from A GFCI protected receptacle...

    Interesting motor!:) -- That's the first 'skeleton frame' synchronous motor I've seen -- A vintage piece indeed!:cool:

    Best regards
    HP
     
  11. KeepItSimpleStupid

    Well-Known Member

    Mar 4, 2014
    1,143
    203
    That style motor was very common back in the day. You need a new power cord.
     
  12. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
    2,781
    1,229
    Indeed! I think we're all agreed that a replacement power cord is essential -- My point was that the OP may wish to consider 'upgrading' to a grounded power cord -- apologies if my post was unclear...

    I'll take your word for it!:) --- FWIW My recollection of small synchronous motors is that of gear-motors housed in 'hermetically sealed' metal 'cans' --- Whereas skeleton frame motors were, generally (non-synchronous) shaded pole types commonly seen in (phonograph) 'turn tables' and, of course, cooling fans in the ubiquitous Tektronix 'boat anchors':D

    With Nostalgic Regards
    HP:)
     
  13. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
    2,781
    1,229
    IMPORTANT: @Todd W. Roat Please read!

    I notice the numeral '1' in the AV (i.e. ' RPM') field of the motor's name plate --- This implies that the motor assembly contains a gear-reduction mechanism -- If the motor works, Please disregard my advice as regards disassembly of the motor (in post #8)! --- Should the motor fail to operate please let us know -- there are a few useful 'kinks'...

    Best regards
    HP
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2015
  14. Todd W. Roat

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 7, 2015
    21
    2
    Thanks again for the help gentlemen. I got the electric fixed but as one might suspect the motor is sluggish. Turns a bit, stops, with a little nudge it goes again, stops, nudge, etc. I read a bunch of articles about getting oil inside the "can" by heating the motor then adding oil to drive spindle - as it cools at it vacuums in. Worked great. But didn't help. These motors are $100 bucks on ebay or $160 rebuilt. Not THAT interested in the project. Against what Ive read im considering cutting a door in the can motor to peek inside and see if I can get out any old dried lubricant sludge Im hoping solidified and is causing my issue. Motor is an B style motor: B3 HNK M2510 1 RPM.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2015
  15. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
    2,781
    1,229
    Probably your best last option -- I would suggest, however, that said 'incision' is NOT made with a grinding tool! -- Lest the unit 'bite the dust' once and for all:eek:;)

    Good luck and please keep us posted!:)
    HP
     
  16. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
    2,781
    1,229
    On second thoughts --- Perhaps you could drill a small hole then gently heat the unit (to perhaps 120 Deg [C]) so as to facilitate drainage of the viscid lubricant --- note also that volatile solvents may be useful in this regard...

    Best regards
    HP
     
  17. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
    6,016
    3,789
    What kind of oil did you use?

    If you are set on trying the hole, I would use a 3/16" bit (sharp and new) and drill with moderate pressure to make some nice sized turnings/chips. Stop as soon as you see a through hole. Pull all the chips away with a good magnet.

    Don't use a fine bit because too much crap will fall in.

    Also, you can try to keep the turnings on a nearby magnet while you drill if you can recruit some extra hands.

    Finally, drill deep enough that you can get oil out.rinse repeatedly to dissolve the sludge. You may try a solvent but make sure it is completely dry and odor free before plugging it in - don't make any sparks.
     
    Hypatia's Protege likes this.
  18. Todd W. Roat

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 7, 2015
    21
    2
  19. Todd W. Roat

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 7, 2015
    21
    2
    Long delay in reply, but wanted to thank everyone or there help. Project finally done. Took a season of antigue shows to fine a replacement motor ($3) but its done, working, and keeping time. Thanks for all the advice!

    [​IMG]
     
    Hypatia's Protege and cmartinez like this.
  20. joeyd999

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jun 6, 2011
    2,677
    2,728
    And, apparently, quite a bit of beer!
     
Loading...