Valentines Day

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by GopherT, Feb 6, 2015.

  1. GopherT

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    Not that it needs any comment, but if you have a special-someone, make those reservations today if you are expected to take her/him out. The date is Saturday, Feb 14. As of today, you can expect dining times after 8pm as the prime times have already been taken.
     
  2. atferrari

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    Funny differencies GoPh, if you happen to see anyone around here at a restaurant at 8 PM you could be sure it is a foreigner or a traveller in need of early rest.☺
     
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  3. GopherT

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    Too funny!
     
  4. spinnaker

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    Not sure I understand. Do you eat late in Argentina or early?

    I would expect very late. Is there not a big Italian influence in Argentina? Italians eat very late. When I was there I would put in a hard day riding my bicycle all day. By 7PM (19:00), I was starving! I would shower then get to the restaurant around 19:00. We would get funny looks, there would be very few people in the restaurant.
     
  5. atferrari

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    In general, much later sp. In restaurants, not cafeterias or equivalents, you hardly would find waiters before 20.00. And in many you still get service if you come around midnight or even later.

    Italian and also Spanish legacy.
     
  6. Reloadron

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    I see the problem here. While you were out riding your bike in Italy you should have been taking the afternoon "riposo". :)
    I actually enjoyed living in Italy for several years. It was amusing watching the Americans go bonkers during the afternoons when things were closed.

    Ron
     
  7. atferrari

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    Doing what, Ron, if I may ask?

    Not only them; locals when go to the small city where I grown up in the province of Córdoba, they get surprised that in downtown, on Saturdays at 12.30, all the shops close in just five minutes and people actually vanishes in ten. Happened to me last November (but I knew it would happen). Last time I checked, during the siesta time, there are just two or maybe three "parrillas" where you could eat something.

    Quiet place in the middle of the countryside, I like it much.
     
  8. Reloadron

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    On my mother's side. My grandmother was Neapolitan descent from the mountains above Napoli. My grandfather was of a Northern Italy descent. During my career I spent about 10 years working for the US Government DoD (Department of Defense). During those years I spent 3 years living in Napoli which were great. Growing up in New York City around the grandparents while not fluent in Italian I fared OK. :) I lived in a beachfront resort area north of Napoli which was quiet right till August. My son was actually born in Italy. Really enjoyed those years, especially the culture and of course the food for a NY Italian boy. : I had been to Italy several times before living there also and maybe someday I will return with my wife to visit again.

    Ron
     
  9. GopherT

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    Sorry, I can't help but think of the awkward Chrysler with the bug-eye headlights when I hear Cordoba - and Ricardo Montalban advertising the, "rich Corinthean Leather" in his "Welcome to Fantasy Island" voice.


    Note the era-appropriate fuzzy dice, and the AC plug for the engine-block heater (yellow plug hanging below the front bumper), vinyl roof and white sidewall tires. This is the 1975 - 77 version. The last model (78-79) has dual over/under rectangle headlights. And that concludes this episode of "Really Bad Cars of Yesteryear"

    image.jpg
     
  10. atferrari

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    Having been to Italy several times in different ports I failed to trace one of my grandfathers, original from Porto Maurizio. The area where I grow up in Córdoba, is the biggest in the world with immigrants coming from Piamonte. At school, probably more than 80% of my classmates were grandsons of that origin. Hard workers they did a lot for this country. Bagna cauda was a common meal in many homes. ;)

    But...the best ristretto (ever!!!), on the counter at the train station of Torre Anunziatta.
     
  11. MaxHeadRoom

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    Must have been north of the Border origin?;)
    Max.
     
  12. GopherT

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    They were common in Minnesota and the Dakotas when I was living there - about the era of this car.
    The security sign on the fence and green street sign are the only location hints in that photo - from Wikipedia on cordoba
     
  13. MaxHeadRoom

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    Could be here!
    Max.
     
  14. spinnaker

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    I have always heard to it as pausa. Once I walked into a place of business during pausa. It was an eyeglass place. I was desperate as I left my glasses at home and only had my contacts (I do not like to wear contacts in the evening). The place was dark. I found some people in the back of the store. After I left it hit me what was going on. I really felt bad interrupting their break.

    On a different occasion, it was nearing lunch time. My buddy panics if he does not eat on schedule. We were passing a McDonalds and he just had to stop. Toen was not that far and no way would I eat at McDonalds in Italy (even though I have done it several times later :) ). I decieded to wait. I rolled into town realizing it was very close to pausa . Irt was a small town. I ran into a store and grabbed some panini. I no sooner stepped out of the store and slam, slam slam., those big metal gates came slamming down all around the piazza at exactly 1PM. They don't mess around. ;)

    Once in LaSpezia, we rolled into town late for lunch. It would be a short day for us. Too hungry to find a hotel, shower and change we went into the restaurant in our bicycle kit. They were pleasant enough but you could tell they were not pleased, we got stuck way in the back. After that I mad sure to keep a pair of long pants on top of my pannier bag. Usually we stop at those markets and pick up some rotisserie chicken for lunch. Then go find a park or out of the way place to eat.

    Being that you lived there you might know. Why the heck do Italians have so much trouble making change. They can get down right upset. Once I was chased out of a resturant in Como just because I did not have change.

    I would love to live there, I envy you. Why did you come back? ;)
     
  15. spinnaker

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    My grandma on my fathers side was born in Padua. Her father has a doctor born in Ital. Her mother immigrated with her parents from Romania with plans to come to the US. They never made it. My grandma came with her parents later. I regret not visiting her birth place when I was nearby. It just was not on the schedule. You are lucky to be able to trace your family. Both sides of my family were very poor immigrants. There was just not enough time to record family history. They were too busy working and dying young.

    I stayed with a friend in Pavia. For some reason he wanted to take us to an agriculture exposition. They had a ristretto tasting event. People were lining up a half hour before the event started. Everyone was all excited. Finally the doors opened, we paid our 5 Euros and sat down. They came around and poured a small glass of wine and served a small scoop of pumpkin ristretto. It was very good. I figured for 5 euros there had to be more. Nope. We left with a sample box of ristretto. To this day I cannot figure out why people got so excited over paying 5 euros for a small scoop of rice and a glass of wine. I also can't figure out why my friend took us to that event. But I would not of traded that night for anything. One of those quirky things that can happen on a tour and that brings back fond memories.
     
  16. Reloadron

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    Never did quite get the change thing either. I did notice the cultural change from north to south. Yeah, life was good, had a 3 bedroom villa right on the Med at a time when the US dollar was strong in Italy. When 3 years was up I had the option of another 3 but declined. During those 3 years traveled Europe extensively but with two kids after the kid born there it was time to come back to the US. :)

    Ron
     
  17. spinnaker

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    Is that baby yours? :)

    I f so, I am sure you have equipped with an intercom for passenger and driver so you don't need to shout. :)
     
  18. spinnaker

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    I have heard it takes forever at the bank. So shop keepers avoid going.
     
  19. Reloadron

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    That was my grandfathers side. The northern side of the clan, the name was Lupo. Actually both my grandparents were US born, my Italian side was in NYC before Ellis Island opened for business. :) Ellis Island, by the way, is an incredibly interestig place to visit. When I was growing up as a kid (late 50s and early 60s) Ellis Island was just crumbling old buildings, once the National Park Service took it over they did a great job. Hurricane Sandy did a job on it and I don't even know if it has reopened?

    Ron
     
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