Vacuum tube from ~1960 radio

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by lagencive, Mar 23, 2014.

  1. lagencive

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 23, 2014
    3
    1
    Hi,

    I am fixing a radio that is about 55 years old. There is a burnt out vacuum tube that needs to be replaced, but it doesn't have clear labelling. The photos are attached.

    I am not sure whether it is possible to determine what type of tube this is. I have looked at similar tubes on electronic supply stores' sites, but I can't find one that is an exact match. If anyone could let me know how I could figure this out (or if by chance you do know what it is), I would be very appreciative.

    Thanks,

    Rob
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2014
  2. atferrari

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 6, 2004
    2,645
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    The lettering below "Westinghouse" is maybe the most important.

    Could you try to read it and post it here if a better picture cannot be taken??
     
  3. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,507
    2,368
    What stage is it in? RF,IF or audio what is the heater voltage, 6.3 or 12.6?
    I have a radio valve catalogue from the 1960's that list multiple manuf and details on tubes from that era, it may also help to list the other tubes.
    Max.
     
    #12 likes this.
  4. RichardO

    Well-Known Member

    May 4, 2013
    1,230
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    Is this a 5 tube radio? If it is, the set of tubes used by almost all manufacturers were very similar.

    Look here for some possibilities (scroll down to the topic "Specific implementations):

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_American_Five
     
  5. burger2227

    Member

    Feb 3, 2014
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    If the radio is worth anything it should have a manufacturer and model number.
     
  6. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
    12,421
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    I would say there is a good chance that the tube can be identified with the following information:

    1) What is the make and model of the radio?
    2) How many tubes are in the radio?
    3) List the part number of every tube. Avoid pulling the tubes with bare fingers to avoid rubbing off the identification numbers.
    4) Provide us with photographs of the radio showing the position of the tubes.
     
  7. debe

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2010
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    3 common front end valves used in that era radios. Most were 6.3V filament, but in a car radio they could be 12V.
     
    lagencive likes this.
  8. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,255
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    I found a likely set:
    12BE6
    12BA6
    50C5 or 50B5 (less common)
    35W4
    and a 12AV6 or 12AT6

    Oh $%^&. I'm answering debe instead of the OP.:mad:
     
  9. lagencive

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 23, 2014
    3
    1
    This is a model 321 (stamped over model 295) Canadian Marconi Company radio.

    There are 7 tubes: (two) 6V6 G7; (two) 6AT6; one 5Y3 GT; one 6BA6 and the mystery tube.

    There is a mark on the board by the mystery tube that says '6BE'. The previous owner said that this was a mistake, and pictures of 6BE tubes I've found don't look like this tube.

    There are photos below. I apologize for the quality, but the components are fixed in place, and I am not able to disassemble the radio this evening to allow for a better shot.

    The layout is (in the front, left to right) is the mystery tube, 6BA6, 6V6 G7 and 5Y3 GT. In the back are the two 6AT6, and the other 6V6 GT.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2014
  10. inwo

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 7, 2013
    2,433
    315
    Response to #12 +1

    The all American 5 with series filaments.:D

    Hope not.:eek: No isolation transformer.

    Everything connected across the mains.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2014
  11. alfacliff

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2013
    2,449
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    one way to get the number is to cool the tube in a refrigerator and then foftly blow your breath on the tube, the numbers sometime fog up before rest of the glass.
    cliff
     
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  12. debe

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2010
    946
    184
    Since there is only 2 tuning gangs, I would lay money on it being 6BE6 as there has to be a Freq converter valve in a Superhet receiver. Check whats connected to the valve socket underneath. Some body may well have put the wrong valve in the socket.
     
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  13. lagencive

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 23, 2014
    3
    1
    It is in fact a 6BE6. Thank you for the help.
     
    debe likes this.
  14. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,255
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    This is not an All American 5. The (2) 6V6's say, "10 watts of audio output power".
    Besides, it has 7 tubes.
     
  15. snav

    Active Member

    Aug 1, 2011
    100
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    And, everything but the rectifier is 6v. ;)

    Nice AM antenna in that Cabinet too.
     
  16. shteii01

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2010
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    Interestingly, neither Model 321 nor Model 295 is listed here: http://www.radiomuseum.org/m/canadia-ma_cdn_en_3~model.html
     
  17. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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  18. burger2227

    Member

    Feb 3, 2014
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