Vacuum cleaner fix suggestions?

Discussion in 'Technical Repair' started by insan3freak, Jul 1, 2016.

  1. insan3freak

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 1, 2016
    1
    0
    So I just plugged a vacuum cleaner into the outlet and it instantly choked, also causing power outtage. As I disassembled it, apart from the dust bag being full I only noticed 1 visually wrong thing. It was a burned end of the little metal thingy that connects the internal wiring to the motor. Burned in a way that there was literally a gap. So, being the amateur I am, I soldered the joint and thought it was all over. But no, the cleaner didn't turn on anyway. So I'm not sure whether it's the wiring ( I don't have the meter) or the motor itself, and I would appreciate help from someone who is more familiar with these kind of systems. At the moment I'm just tinkering trying to identify what the problem is. I will attach some images below, thanks in advance.



    WP_20160701_13_53_20_Pro.jpg WP_20160701_13_53_41_Pro.jpg WP_20160701_13_54_37_Pro.jpg
     
  2. KJ6EAD

    Senior Member

    Apr 30, 2011
    1,425
    363
    It looks like one of your brush holders has destroyed itself. The terminal from it, still attached to the power wire, has shorted to the motor housing. Unless you can find and replace the brush holder assembly, the entire unit is probably not economically repairable.

    The root cause of failure may be the brush holder itself or it may be secondary to a brush getting too short, a brush spring weakening or even a bearing failure. For the system to work properly, the commutator must spin concentrically, the brushes must be sprung against the commutator consistently, the brushes must move freely perpendicular to the commutator face and be of sufficient length that they don't jam and the electrical connections must be sound.
     
  3. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,515
    2,369
    It almost appears to have a pot/triac controller for it, never personally seen one on a V.C.?
    The motor is a 240v Universal type so you should be able to connect direct to the supply (two blue wires) and bypass the controller to test
    Those bare connections look very unsafe with no insulation!:(
    Max.
     
  4. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
    2,781
    1,227
    To @KJ6EAD 's and @MaxHeadRoom 's (spot on) observations -- I would add that such failure/malfunction occasionally follows excessive commutator arcing secondary to:

    1) commutator contamination by finely divided 'brush material'
    2) commutator pitting...
    3) 'Over flush' extension of segment-to-segment insulators/spacers

    Nos 1 & 2 may be remedied via an appropriately cut strip of #400 grit wet/dry abrasive paper -- Said strip being positioned ('slung') about the commutator during manual rotation of the armature... -- Note, also, that the brushes may be dressed in similar fashion (but with the abrasive 'reversed' such that it is 'backed' by the Commutator)

    #3 Requires undercutting of the insulators - taking great care to avoid damage to the segments!:cool:

    At this point it sounds as if the damage has run it's full course:( -- Should you locate replacement parts please consider the above prior to returning the appliance to service:)

    Best regards and good luck
    HP:)
     
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  5. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,515
    2,369
    Many modern commutators use auto-wearing insulation material now rather than the older Mica style which required undercutting.
    Max.
     
  6. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
    2,781
    1,227
    Good deal!:) -- Especially as regards consumer goods where the maintenance cost would likely exceed that of replacement!:cool:

    Many thanks for the info!:cool:

    Best regards
    HP:)
     
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