V or I written with ^ or -

Discussion in 'Homework Help' started by norstudent, Mar 6, 2014.

  1. norstudent

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 26, 2014
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    Hi

    What do the ^ on top of V/E or I mean and what does the straight line above them mean?

    For example Î and.. (I cant type the others, you probably know what I mean)

    Please clarify!
     
  2. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    The circumflex (^) can mean that the quantity is a vector.
    The horizontal bar above a capital letter can mean either the logical complement as in "NOT V" or it can also mean the average or mean value. Can you give us some context?
     
  3. studiot

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 9, 2007
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  4. norstudent

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 26, 2014
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    Sorry.. The context is power calculations in AC circuits!
     
  5. studiot

    AAC Fanatic!

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  6. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    The ^ is also often used for the "expectation value", so if you had a problem that was dealing with a measured or actual value in comparison to a calculated value, you might see it used that way.

    But I agree with the others that it is probably indicating that it is a phasor, possibly a unit vector.

    It would help if you could scan a bit of text or a diagram that uses them both so that we have some good context to consider.
     
  7. daviddeakin

    Active Member

    Aug 6, 2009
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    My old professor used to use the ^ to mean the peak value, and the straight line to mean the average (mean) or DC value.
     
  8. LvW

    Active Member

    Jun 13, 2013
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    Not only "old" professors.
    Yes - for my opinion and according to my knowledge (and education in Germany) this sign indicates PEAK values.
     
  9. BytetoEat

    New Member

    Mar 5, 2014
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    It's for phasors..
     
  10. vk6zgo

    Active Member

    Jul 21, 2012
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    I've only seen it for peak values in Australia,too.
     
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