Using two power supplies

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by OSOO, Jun 12, 2014.

  1. OSOO

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 19, 2014
    34
    0
    Hello,

    Can I use two power supplies in my circuit ,
    for example 5v voltage to half of the circuit and 6v to the other half ?
     
  2. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,135
    1,786
    Your question is so vague as to make any answer meaningless. What kind of circuit are we talking about?
     
  3. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
    12,977
    3,220
    You can generally use as many power supplies as you like as long as the voltages are compatible with the circuits being powered.
     
  4. Fibonacci

    New Member

    May 23, 2014
    25
    5
    The answer is yes. There are several situations, for example in op-amps, or using 7406 logic inverter with open collector output. It is an inverter buffer with +5V power supply but it can handle up to 30 Vcd between a pull-up resistor and the output with a maximum 40 mA of sink current.
     
  5. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
    4,769
    969
    As others have stated a proper answer is "maybe".. not yes.
    Its just guessing without any necessary details.
     
  6. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,500
    2,365
    There is also the question of whether the circuits require isolation from each other or if the commons can be connected together.
    Max.
     
  7. djsfantasi

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 11, 2010
    2,790
    827
    I agree with the others; the answer is a qualified yes.

    Why do you want to do this? How do the sub-circuits interface with each other? And how isolated must they be?

    Here is an example of a 5V microcontroller driving a 12V relay. One example of mixed voltages. However, if it were to directly control a 120VAC lamp, it would be a completely different schematic.

    [​IMG]
     
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