Using the 4066

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Sleepreaper, Dec 14, 2012.

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  1. Sleepreaper

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 12, 2012
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    Hi all

    Can I get some advice on the 4066 it sounds like what I need to use I just don't have the expertise to correctly ascertain if what I'm doing would be right.

    So here goes:
    I have two power inputs leading into one ring circuit of lights, however one is switch controlled via door switch and the other utilises a motion sensor. What I think I should use is the 4066 to pick up which input is returning a signal and commit that to my lights.

    Is this correction the usage for the 4066, my circuit is only a 12v dc circuit I read the maximum volt for the 4066 is higher so should be capable of this.

    Any help highly welcomed I'm new to the forum and my last post was well cough cough closed!! I hope this has been worded correctly as to not offend the rules of the sites mod :)
     
  2. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    The 4066 is intended to control low currents. You cannot use this to power lights.

    What you want is an OR function, either the door switch OR the motion sensor to power your lights.
    You can do this by wiring the motion sensor in parallel with your switch.

    What type of lights are they? How much voltage and current do they require?
    Usually a doorbell switch uses a 12VAC transformer.
    What you need is a 12VAC relay that closes its contacts in parallel with the motion sensor.

    This depends on the details you provide.
     
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  3. Sleepreaper

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 12, 2012
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    Actually I believe I should use the 4001 chip instead as it isn't a NAND gate its an or gate which is perfect for what I need.
     
  4. Sleepreaper

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 12, 2012
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    Hi mr chips tanks for the quick reply, its a dc circuit 12v I cannot run this I parallel because the door switch powers the lights from a separate power supply and my motion sensor again has a separate supply. This I cannot alter, if I merge the circuits the I could create an overflow to the opposite power supply hense my need to switch supplies rather than simply join them
     
  5. Ron H

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 14, 2005
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    No, it's not perfect. It can't provide enough current to drive your LEDs.
    Post a link to your motion sensor, or at least a part number.
    Is you door switch closed when the lights are to be on, or is it open?
     
  6. Sleepreaper

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 12, 2012
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    Damn this is going to be hard to discuss as he reason for the circuit is actually not allowed inside the forum which kinda s""ks because its got me back interested in electronics and circuitry...

    So lets for the sake of this forum class this as a cupboard I'm lighting :)

    When my door motion sensor detects movement it sends power to my LEDs when my door switch is on it sends a power to them, however the motion sensor only goes off when the door is opened. So when the door is closed it turns off so if I'm still in the "cupboard" and I need my light I have the switch. However I don't want to cause a short circuit if both are on or a back play of positive to a separate supply circuit


    Basically I'm looking for a miso switch containing an or gate
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2012
  7. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    Ok, you will have to rewrite this in some kind of logic flow. I don't get this.

    When you say "motion sensor only goes off" do you mean "motion sensor is triggered"?

    "Goes off" for an LED would mean the LED emits no light.
     
  8. Ron H

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 14, 2005
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    You simply put the switch in series with the lights. You turn on a relay with the motion sensor, and connect its normally open contacts in parallel with the switch. When either one is on, the lights are on. That's an OR gate.
     
  9. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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    Hello,

    AGAIN: Hiding the automotive requirements does not help you.

    I am closing this thread as it violates AAC policy and/or safety issues.

    Quote:
    6. Restricted topics. The following topics are regularly raised however are considered “off-topic” at all times and will results in Your thread being closed without question:

    • Any kind of over-unity devices and systems
    • Automotive modifications
    • Devices designed to electrocute or shock another person
    • LEDs to mains
    • Phone jammers
    • Rail guns and high-energy projectile devices
    • Transformer-less power supplies
    This comes from our Tos:
    Terms of Service
    There will be enough sites where automotive questions can be discussed :
    Member selected automotive forums

    bertus
     
  10. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,764
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    There is another high quality forum that will probably be of more help, called ElectroTech. This site is owned, and the owner has chosen not to go there. Part of our jobs as moderators is see his wishes and rules are upheld.

    http://www.electro-tech-online.com/
     
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