use of "current" in Vol I, Chp 13, Capacitance

Discussion in 'Feedback and Suggestions' started by swaller, Jan 19, 2007.

  1. swaller

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 19, 2007
    2
    0
    First, thanks for a great site and a fantastic resource!
    Very basic question: in Vol. I, chp 13, I got confused when I read:
    I understood that "current" exists when there is a circuit. With a capacitor, as in the circuit diagram immediately preceding the sentence just quoted, there seems to be no circuit (unless the electric field counts as a conductor). So I don't understand how the capacitor can "draw current".
    Or is it that current exists (for however short a time) whenever there is a difference of voltage across a length of conductor? i.e. a "circuit" doesn't have to be "round", or start and finish at the same point??
    Any help in getting my head around this would be greatly appreciated!
    Steve
     
  2. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
    6
    Your second paragraph is correct. Current will flow between any realative potentials if a path of suitably low impedence exists.
     
  3. swaller

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 19, 2007
    2
    0
    Thank you, thingmaker. I'll reread the first few sections of Vol I and see if I can get a clearer idea of what "circuit" means.
     
Loading...