Use of a rf transistor

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by pafrazier, Aug 15, 2013.

  1. pafrazier

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jun 4, 2011
    57
    0
  2. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,294
    6,805
    I think so, but I wouldn't spend $40 for a transistor unless I knew how high the operating frequency needs to be.
     
  3. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,144
    1,790
    It is an old aphorism in RF design that the best way to design an oscillator is to start with an amplifier. It doesn't even have to be a high gain amplifier.:eek:
     
  4. jegues

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 13, 2010
    735
    43
    Some of you old farts should take some time to compile a list of all the aphorisms that have stood the test of time into a single thread!

    That way us young ones can learn a thing or two!:D
     
  5. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,294
    6,805
    I have several to contribute, but the list would require somebody to manage it so it doesn't finish up cluttered with discussion and duplicates.
     
  6. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
    13,014
    3,234
    You can, but they aren't particularly fast in such an application. For fast switching you need a transistor optimized for switching, which is doped to reduce the storage time, such as the 2N2369. RF transistors don't have this doping and thus have a longer storage time, even though they are fast for RF applications operating in the linear region, where storage time is not a factor.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2013
    #12 likes this.
  7. pafrazier

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jun 4, 2011
    57
    0
    I will check out the 2N2369. Just what I needed.

    Thanks
     
Loading...