University Curriculum

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Georacer, Jan 11, 2013.

  1. Georacer

    Thread Starter Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
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    As I promised, here is the curriculum guide for my EE school. I was lucky enough to find it already translated.

    The courses titles begin at page 25 (22 in the document). Below you can search the IDs and find more in depth descriptions.

    I have highlighted with yellow the courses I have followed. Not all of them are required to get my degree, but I changed my mind a couple of times.
     
  2. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    Very nice. My study would have been more of a hybridization between Flow Y and S, though my program dealt with classes from each of the flows.

    That Neural Networks and Intelligent Systems class sounds awesome! I've been reading up on neural networks and would have loved a formal education on them.

    I wish I could have taken more robotics classes, reading about these are making me want to go back to school!
     
  3. Georacer

    Thread Starter Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
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    You have to pick either three full flows (7 courses) or two full and two halves (4 courses). It's explained in the guide.

    I chose flows Y, H and S. S flow has got me sweating, mostly because of the bad organizing and bad professor behaviour.
     
  4. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    Ah, I seem to have skipped over that part....

    I was really bad at controls for this same reason. It wasn't until I had a good professor teaching a lab that I understood what it all meant...
     
  5. Georacer

    Thread Starter Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
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    I love automated control and robotics. But those professors make it so hard for me. In the end, I pursued the robotics field outside of those courses, choosing a thesis subject with a professor from the neighbouring ME school.
     
  6. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    That's unfortunate. There is a unique perspective to be had on robotics from a electronics perspective, though, that's not to say a ME couldn't also...
     
  7. maxpower097

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    Feb 20, 2009
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    Great coarse selections.
     
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  8. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
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    I saw your robotics I & II courses highlighted in the table. Was your recent post about the USB powered fan with with tea light accent part of the robotics course? What did you do in that course?

    I'm wondering if I need to go to MIT in order to touch anything that could be described as a ROBOT.
     
  9. Georacer

    Thread Starter Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
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    Of course the fan wasn't related to those classes. That was part of a mini building contest a student union organized.

    You can find detailed descriptions of those two courses on pages 65 and 66 in the .pdf of the first post.

    In short, robotics I was about multi-joint arms forward and inverse kinematic models, jacobian and inverse jacobian matrices and a bit of static analysis. Basically, what you need to operate a robotic arm.

    Robotics II was about Kalman filters, navigation methods, redundant degrees of freedom and serving tasks of different priority with that redundancy.

    I don't think I would pass those courses again if I was examined tomorrow, nor I mastered them back then, but hopefully I 'll be able to pick it up relatively easily if the need arises.

    Building your first robot nowadays is EASY. Other platforms existed (LEGO NXT etc) but Arduino sure made it happen cheaply. I can give you some advice on that.
    BUT it depends on your perception of a "robot". My mother keeps asking me to build her the next 3CPO to take care of the household, but if you just want a robotic arm or an autonomous mini-rover it's certainly doable.
     
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  10. amilton542

    Active Member

    Nov 13, 2010
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    Congratulations. You're very lucky Georacer. It's very exotic indeed. This makes me feel resentment for the UK education system. The true research for me will never begin until after I graduate; it's all a bit "Mickey-Mouse" over here.
     
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  11. Georacer

    Thread Starter Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
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    It's true that you can find many advanced and interesting courses in my EE school. But there's always a catch.
    In the case of Greek engineering schools, you must come to terms with the very real possibility that you might as well not pass the course, despite spending, what might seem to you, a reasonable amount of time studying.

    Unlike private foreign universities, you are not a customer there, therefore you are not treated as a person with privileges. It's more like a citizen - civil servant relation.
     
  12. amilton542

    Active Member

    Nov 13, 2010
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    From my experience I feel there is a sense of statistics involved with the fact of the matter. In other words, the Principle begs the question, "Are we achieving or not?" The risk of a student's failure could be regarded as dangerous by virtue of which dramatically effects the success rates. The managerial bodies are interested in figures at the end of day. Poor results across the spectrum reflect back on staff and, surprisingly, not the students. So, in effect, I feel the curriculum has been made easier for the UK.

    It's beginning to dawn on me now in that I'm going to finish with a colossal debt resting on my shoulders for an education I could have equally self-educated myself through.

    The math doesn't get no more complicated than integration by part, chain rule, differential equations etcetera. Topics like Abstract Algebra, Differential Geometry, Vector & Tensor Calculus? Pfff, you're havin' a giraffe.

    The difficulty of physics and circuit analysis goes in hand-in-hand with the aforesaid, too. Lagrangian Dynamics is no where to be seen. Transformer theory terminates at the equivalent circuit and so on... you get the picture.
     
  13. Georacer

    Thread Starter Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
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    I had a chuckle reading your post. It made me realize how little we know about each other's countries sometimes.

    Greek universities are not governed by statistics. As a matter of fact, they're not governed by manager's either! They are staffed by professors only who are given money solely from the government to produce research and tutor the students.
    Which means that there is no pace to step up their game, since they are civil employees with few or zero review, but they are also left alone to focus on giving their all to research and teaching. Hence the advanced curriculum.
    Did I mention the Greek university is FREE?
    It's a double edged blade.

    I feel compelled to admit that the engineering school has molded me vastly in the last 5 years. There was no chance I would have learned what I know now without attending. I could have learned how to work with a PIC or build a Tesla coil, but an engineer I would not be.

    P.S. The math can get mindblowingly, frustratingly, out-of-this-planet hard and intangible. But it's your choice to ignore them.
     
  14. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    :eek:
    Sounds wonderful! I wish they had that in the US, that way I wouldn't have had to work my way through college and could have slept more than 30 hours a week!

    I had a professor who said that his job isn't to teach, his job is to read tell us to read the book, I thought it was a joke...turns out, him being a 'teacher' is the joke!
     
  15. amilton542

    Active Member

    Nov 13, 2010
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    I enjoy the maths and physics side of the coin the most now. I've also taken a shine to structural engineering now, too.

    Ok Georacer, good luck to you.
     
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  16. Sparky49

    Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
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    But it is not a debt in the traditional sense.


    This government has made the tuition fees and loans much better for everyone. Most only know of the £9000 cap, and think the changes are bad. They are not aware that there is more to it.


    You do not have to pay a single penny, until you are earning over a certain amount. If you cannot find a job after uni, or a job which pays under x amount, then you will not have bailiffs knocking on your door. You will not have to pay anything until you earn over (I believe it is now) £26000 a year.


    Furthermore, when you get to 50, your student loan is wiped clean. If you have not paid a penny, you will not have to pay anything past 50. No matter what job you get after.


    If you have paid some back, the remainder too is wiped.


    It pays (pun intended) to know exactly what sort of 'debt' the English student loans are. We are extremely lucky to have a system which, unlike the system in the US for example, doesn't leave you with a pile of debt you have to pay back - wether you are earning or not.


    Sparky
     
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