Universal CNC

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Quwat, Feb 20, 2014.

  1. Quwat

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 15, 2013
    8
    0
    Hello everyone

    I decided its about time I did a CNC based project. So recently I have done a lot of research and pulled together a little design.

    If it works as well as I want it to I will be able to use it for:

    # I’ll start with an Ink plotter: it would be cool to make a font of my own hand writing, then get it to write letters or something.

    # Laser engraver: when an old DVD player turns up on freecycle

    # PCB mill: set and forget easiest system for homebrew pcb

    # Softwood mill: to make creepy wooden portraits of family for presents

    # 3D printer: because everyone needs one
    Check out my idea’s so far here, tell me what you think I could do better. I want to send off for parts soon

    [​IMG]
     
  2. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,542
    2,369
    I presume you have that large a Z axis travel to cater for high objects? once you go with a large Z axis travel this limits you to low force applications, due to the rigidity issue.
    I didn't see any front-end software reference? Mach or Linux etc?
    The links appear to be CAM s/w?
    You might to also register on the CNCzone site for this kind of application.
    Max.
     
  3. Quwat

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 15, 2013
    8
    0
    Yes for if I end up using it as a 3D printer. Do you have any ideas on how to improve the rigidity without adding another stepper motor?

    My laptop doesn't have a parallel port. I will use reprap compatible software to send gcode to a micro.

    Just registered on CNCzone, Thanks
     
  4. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
    2,375
    998
    Don't use wood.
     
  5. djsfantasi

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 11, 2010
    2,804
    833
    Not using wood is not necessarily a solution. The solution is to design the supports to minimize motion in all dimensions. For example, on the two large upright pieces, I would add braces at 90 degrees to the plane of the supports.

    You could do this in wood by a) picking a stable wood for the components, such as MDF, and b) attaching "wings" of 1/4" or greater MDF or plywood, glued into a slot routed into the main piece.

    This could also be done in aluminum or steel (preferred) angles. See
    http://m.homedepot.com/p/Crown-Bolt...teel-Angle-with-1-8-in-Thick-42110/202183506/ or similar products. A steel/aluminum/iron frame can be combined with wood for the bed.

    The CNC sites likely have much more complete information.
     
  6. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,542
    2,369
    Also the conceptual drawing you show does not have the ability to travel completely in the Y axis direction.
    For a fixed spindle, the Y axis has to have the ability for total ± movement under the spindle.
    Max.
     
  7. Quwat

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 15, 2013
    8
    0
    >djsfantasi
    I was going to wait until I put it together as is before adding bracing. I think using anything more than MDF for bracing wouldn't be make much of a difference, when I get it milling it won't be anything hardcore.

    >MaxHeadRoom
    Although it may not look it the bed has full clearance. The bed will move over the walls of the frame, and the bearings underneath will have 5mm clearance from hitting the wall. That's where I will put the limit switches. I did this to make the whole thing more compact when not in use.
     
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