Ultimate power tool(s) (holy crap I got almost a whole machine shop)

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by strantor, Nov 16, 2012.

  1. strantor

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
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    I got 3 awesome machines for free. My generous benefactor is the honorable dfletch (Doug) from this forum, and I got these in response to his post here :http://www.hobby-machinist.com/showthread.php/9450-Free-machines).

    Having never seen the machines, I just rented a trailer and drove up there ASAP to snatch them up.
    First up, The power hacksaw. It's an excelsior 2-A, I estimate it's older than 1930, probably closer to 1900. Just a layman's guess from looking at the design. If anybody knows better, or knows anything at all about it, let me know.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG].

    Doug said it works, but is super worn out. It fell over while being loaded and now the main sheave is cracked and will need to be replaced, along with all the bushings. I really like thing. I am going to do a full restore on it, sandblast, paint, the whole 9 yards.Next, the bandsaw. I can't find a model number on it anywhere, and the only reason I know it's a Forte brand is because it says to "only replace with quality Forte brand blades." It weighs probably 500lbs or more. it's missing a gear, but otherwise I don't see anything preventing it from running. Nothing froze up, bearings good. It has a cutting fluid tank and pump. I (again, layman) estimate it's 1970's vintage. Again, if anybody knows anything about this machine, I would appreciate the info.

    [​IMG]

    And finally, the Lathe. This is an Imperial brand lathe, made in Italy. I measured 8.5 inches from center of the headstock to the ways, so I guess that makes it a 17" swing. It's about 9ft long. Nameplate on the motor says 1953. I have no idea what the model# is, cannot find one anywhere on the lathe. The tailstock that came with it is not the correct tailstock, but can be made to work; it is facing the wrong direction and 1/2" too low. I cannot find anything on the internet about this lathe, and I have only seen one other person on the internet that has one (metal lathe of this brand, much less model), and he also cannot find any information on it. Doug also found zero information. It has a taper attachment, 3 jaw, and 4 jaw chucks. It is missing a gear, the motor is burnt up, and the control wiring is missing. Missing the slide that the tool post bolts to. got lots of surface rust, and QC gear handle is broken off. The electrical portion should be a breeze for me, but this will be the most extensive and challenging mechanical project I have ever attempted. I don't know the extent of it, as I have not really looked at other than loading and unloading it. and once more, if anybody has information, I'm greatly appreciative. Here's some pics:

    [​IMG]

    Here's some pics of the loading and unloading process. It took 8 hours for me to unload it with an engine hoist and a comealong jack. I don't know how much this lathe weighs, but I estimate it weighs at least as much as my truck (~4000lbs). Doug's forklift stalled out a few times trying to put it on the trailer. Leaving Doug's shop:

    [​IMG]

    arriving at my home:[​IMG]
     
  2. strantor

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    Oct 3, 2010
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    lifting the lathe up one end a time with the engine hoist to get 4X4" pine skids under it:[​IMG]

    Skids done. The upright 4X4's are less to support the bed and more to prevent the skids from splitting when it gets high centered on a roller pipe.:
    [​IMG]

    Like shown in this pic:[​IMG]

    I put 1" pipe under the skids and jacked the lathe back toward the end of the trailer until it passed the center of gravity, where the trailer wanted to tilt back. Then I strapped the lathe down and let the trailer tilt. From there, I took my comealong jack to the front of the trailer and used it in reverse, to control the descent of the lathe. My comealong onyl takes up/releases about 3 feet, so I had to keep stopping, strapping down the lathe, and resetting the comealong.
    [​IMG]

    Finally got all 3 of these beasts into the garage around midnight.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. gerty

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    Aug 30, 2007
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    Nice haul !! I'd settle for the floor space all of it takes.:D
     
  4. Six_Shooter

    Member

    Nov 10, 2012
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    NICE!!!

    Someday, when I have enough space I will have a few machine shop tools as well, for now, I just go to my Grandfather's and use his, or more commonly have him do something for me. :D

    His lathe and mill were moved into his garage in much the same way, on multiple tubes from the garage door to the back wall of the garage.
     
  5. strantor

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    That method works well for moving it long-ways in straight line. Next I have to figure out how to turn it 90 degrees and move it to the back of the garage. Might be easier (or at least safer) just to rearrange the garage around it where it sits.
     
  6. shortbus

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    As long as you have the room, the turn can also be made using the rollers. By angling them in the direction you want to go. That's how I moved my lathe and Bridgeport to their resting places.

    Good haul and have fun.
     
  7. Six_Shooter

    Member

    Nov 10, 2012
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    LOL, I know people who have done just that.

    As shortbus said, using rollers angled will allow the lathe to be turned. You may have to in a cramped area, roll it back a forth, making a "multi-point" turn. ;)

    I used this method to move a shed from the front of my backyard to the rear, around a tree, and back against the fence. I used 6" diameter logs to move my shed, but the same idea applies to using smaller diameter tube.
     
  8. strantor

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    I just a potentially clever idea. I could make some simple air bearings on my little lathe and slap em under the skids. Maybe then it would glide across my garage floor with a nudge from my pinky, as if it were sitting on oiled ice. Never used air bearings though, so not sure how well they work, or the weight limit.
     
  9. Kermit2

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  10. Sparky49

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    Jul 16, 2011
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    Hi,

    Does your garage have beams?

    If you stick some steel poles across as many beams as possible and in the corners of the joints, you might be able to hoist it and swing it around.

    Sparky
     
  11. strantor

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    Oct 3, 2010
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    haha, yeah, that's actually how I unloaded my other lathe. But it only weighed a few hundred pounds. My rafters are entirely unsuited for lifting. The modifications needed to lift this behemoth would basically entail transforming my entire garage internally into an industrial gantry crane.
     
  12. gerty

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    Aug 30, 2007
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