TV cables

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by GTeclips, Mar 8, 2012.

  1. GTeclips

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 18, 2012
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    0
    Okay, I know this is incredible random, but I have been wondering this recently how when you plug a gaming counsel into a TV (Xbox, play station ex.), thousands of bits of data of audio and video can travel through just three wire within seconds! This is very facinating to me and I have tried to look it up, but nothing answers my question. Can any of you explain this to me. Thank you for viewing!
     
  2. Vahe

    Member

    Mar 3, 2011
    75
    9
    This section is for Homework Help ...
     
  3. GTeclips

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 18, 2012
    96
    0
    My electrical interests are a hobby, and thus, anything I ask does not pertain to homework. But the only reason I ask this no-homework question in this section is because there is not a specific section for asking question. (Do correct me if I am wrong though.) So I saw this as the only question asking section partaining to electrical engineering, so I have asked a few question in this section. But if need be, or I am disrupting the forums, I will stop asking questions that do not have anything to due with homework in this section.
     
  4. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,298
    6,808
    Try "General Electronics Chat", the first option on the forums page.

    By the way, TV tuners work at hundreds of MHz. It's pretty easy to stuff a kilobyte into a megahertz.

    The 3 wire hookup doesn't go that fast, but I don't know how fast it goes. Somebody else can probably come up with that number.

    Meanwhile, I will report this to the boss and have him move it to "Chat".
     
  5. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,766
    2,536
    I'm not a or the boss, but I get er done.

    I am amazed how much data can be packed into a single wire myself, and I consider myself a professional. There are many analog tricks that can be used to increase data rates. Modems are a classic example, they use a phone line that is limited to an analog frequency of 3.4Khz, but can achieve data rates over 33K Baud. Part of how they do it is modulation schemes.

    It turns out you can chop a sine wave up into many pieces and still have the information make it over the phone lines.
     
  6. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
    13,014
    3,234
    The highest speed a telephone modem can go in the US is about 53k Baud (using what is commonly called a 56k modem). They do that by synchronizing the bits with the 64k/s sample rate of the PCM scheme used to transmit the telephone signal between exchanges. Basically each digital bit is nestled into the PCM sample. Synchronizing eliminates the quantizing noise that otherwise occurs when digitizing a signal on an analog line and thus allows a higher Baud rate.
     
  7. GTeclips

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 18, 2012
    96
    0
    Oh, ok, I see how it works. That does seem a bit incredible. Thanks guys
     
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