Trying to learn to read a simple datasheet

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by pedro147, Oct 6, 2015.

  1. pedro147

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 1, 2013
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    I am looking for a 1.27mm shorting jumper and when I look at the datasheet the drawing shows what I assume is a range of dimensions for different size pitches for the two pin package, like for example 1.0 over 2.54. Am I correct in assuming that this is a generic drawing for components ranging from pitch 0.1mm to 2.54mm. Sorry for the basic question but I have to start somewhere :) Thanks
     
  2. pwdixon

    Member

    Oct 11, 2012
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    No I'm afraid you're not correct. I think you are referring to the pitch of 0.1/2.54, that's 0.1 inch/2.54 mm. Only one pitch size on this drawing.
     
  3. pedro147

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 1, 2013
    52
    2
    Thanks pwdixon. What I find confusing is that the first link in my question is for a part of 1.27mm pitch and the datasheet for that product, of that pitch leads to my second link with this ambiguous information. I see what you are saying and it makes sense, but did you look at the first link and see what I am saying please.
     
  4. ericgibbs

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 29, 2010
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    hi,
    There is some ambiguity between the Data sheet, which shows a 2.54mm pin pitch with a 0.100mm tolerance and the suppliers data clip which shows a 1.27mm pin pitch.

    Is this what you are asking.?
    E
     
  5. pedro147

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 1, 2013
    52
    2
    Yes ericgibbs sort of thanks :) So you are saying that the 0.1/2.54 is a 0.1mm tolerance whereas pwdixon is saying that the 0.1 in 0.1/2.54 is the imperial equivalent of 2.54mm. Unfortunately now I am even more confused with two completely different explanations or am I misunderstanding one or both of you
     
  6. pwdixon

    Member

    Oct 11, 2012
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    Those two numbers are definitely the imperial and metric values.

    The two datasheets (one via Mouser and one given directly by you) are the same, probably the Mouser summary of 1.27mm is wrong.
     
  7. ericgibbs

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 29, 2010
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    hi pedro,
    As you know 2.54 mm equals 0.1 inch and 1.27 mm equals 0.05 inch
    Some drawings do use a similar method of showing the tolerances of the main dimension.

    What is the point which is causing you concern.?

    E

    BTW: I am not disputing what 'pwd' is posting, my concern was the difference between the suppliers 1.27mm and the datasheet showing 2.54mm
     
  8. pwdixon

    Member

    Oct 11, 2012
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    It doesn't help that molex have changed the part number for that particular connector series.
     
  9. pedro147

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 1, 2013
    52
    2
    Thanks to both of you. I just wanted to try and confirm that the part in the first link of my initial question had a pitch of 1.27mm. I thought that the best means of confirming this was to look at the datasheet but this is when I became confused. You electronics guys are certainly up against it with ambiguous information like this being provided :) I will assume that the initial product description is correct
     
  10. pwdixon

    Member

    Oct 11, 2012
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    This is not a 1.27mm part.
     
  11. pedro147

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 1, 2013
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    I am more confused than I was two hours ago :) Why does this link say pitch 1.27mm please See here
     
  12. pwdixon

    Member

    Oct 11, 2012
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    Because Mouser made a mistake.
     
    ericgibbs likes this.
  13. pwdixon

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    Oct 11, 2012
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  14. pedro147

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 1, 2013
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    So the Digikey link goes to a 2.54m pitch component that I do not want - Thanks dxdixon :)
     
  15. pwdixon

    Member

    Oct 11, 2012
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    surely you know what the mating part is, so you should easily be able to identify the matching connector
     
  16. pedro147

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 1, 2013
    52
    2
    It connects to a 2 pin header strip to bridge it hence the name "shorting jumper" Look this is just going around in circles so thanks for your help and have a nice day :)
     
  17. ericgibbs

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 29, 2010
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    hi pedro,
    Is it possible to measure the actual distance between the two pins that the jumper is going to link.?
    Most jumpers I have used are 2.54mm [ 0.1inch]
    Many scrap PC, PCB's have loads of such jumpers you could recycle

    E
     
  18. pedro147

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 1, 2013
    52
    2
    Thanks Eric. Yes it is definitely 1.27mm. It is on a very small radio controlled flight control circuit and that stuff is tiny :) I managed to find what I need at Digikey. Thanks for your suggestion you are a true gent
     
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