Transmitter Receiver For Domestic Use

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by AAAGR, Oct 23, 2011.

  1. AAAGR

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 23, 2011
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  2. chrisw1990

    Active Member

    Oct 22, 2011
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    thats as easy as iv ever seen. might favourite it myself!
     
  3. Georacer

    Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
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    The circuit you posted isn't that hard to build. It actually will take very little space on a PCB.

    Do you have any questions regarding the circuit you posted?
    What does the PIC have to do with this project? Do you intent to use it as a "sound chip"?

    What do you have in mind when you talk about an IC?
     
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  4. AAAGR

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 23, 2011
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    First of all, Kai egw ellinas eimai.
    I understand how the transmiter works. What troubles me is the reciever.
    I dont fully understand how it operates and also what are these symbols that look like amplifiers?

    The PIC will receive an input pulse from the reciever but the PIC part is not of my concern cause it is my partners job.

    When i say IC i mean if there is something that includes the recievers and transmiters circuits within the IC.
     
  5. Georacer

    Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
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    Καλησπέρα,

    The building instructions are quite clear. The theory of operation eludes myself too, but I 'm sure other members can help you on that.

    The dotted triangle is a logic gate, an inverter. See here for its datasheet:
    http://www.datasheetcatalog.org/datasheets/90/206781_DS.pdf
    It will output the inverted logic level its reads in its input.

    If I read the schematic correctly, when the receiver is triggered, the input voltage at the sound chip will go high, powering it. You can replace this with a PIC input to command it to do whatever you want.

    Alternatively, there are commercial remote doorbells that work with batteries. You could mod their receiver and drive their LED or buzzer output to your PIC.

    Other people's input is welcome.
     
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  6. chrisw1990

    Active Member

    Oct 22, 2011
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    not quite sure what you mean when you talk about the IC here, the circuits use an IC for the inverters for the receivers
     
  7. AAAGR

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 23, 2011
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    I mean an IC that would include pretty much everything. I was thinking about an IC that has all the circuity within it. I m not sure if such a thing exists so all suggestions are accepted.
     
  8. chrisw1990

    Active Member

    Oct 22, 2011
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    some ICs do exist, from TI (Texas Instruments) though their cost would greatly outweigh just implementing this system! =]
     
  9. debjit625

    Well-Known Member

    Apr 17, 2010
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    Georacer already answered that,you can find a bit more about it here
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inverter_(logic_gate)

    Why would somebody do that ,receivers and transmitters at the same place it will be useless.Yes if you are only trying to do a duplex communication, but as per your project it seems that it's not the case.

    No, not possible as you have to bias the IC and in RF circuitry there are some components which can't be fitted inside an IC .The circuit you posted is quite easy...go with it

    EDIT:
    If you are using PIC you can use RF transreceiver ,but that will make your circuit a bit complex and more costly but the end result will be a efficient system.

    Good Luck
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 24, 2011
  10. praondevou

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jul 9, 2011
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    yes it exists.

    you need this:
    http://www.linxtechnologies.com/products/rf-modules/lc-series-low-cost-transmitter-modules/

    and this:
    http://www.linxtechnologies.com/pro...-series-remote-control-encoders-and-decoders/

    Have a read through their datasheets and ask if anything is unclear.
     
  11. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    The RF section is a modified Colpitts oscillator (Google it) that uses the PCB traces as components. Since we don't have the PCB layout it will be hard to reproduce. The 32Khz crystal oscillator is a modulating frequency, and is probably illegal in the USA and other countries (though it is sold commercial) only because the FCC hasn't noticed it yet. Being a weak oscillator, it will fall under the radar indefinitely.

    You can find other kinds of oscillators that are friendlier to build elsewhere. Amateur Radio (AKA HAM radio) do this routinely.
     
  12. AAAGR

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 23, 2011
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    I checked Colpitts oscillator. The one in the web site though, doesnt have 2 inductors. So what formula would give the output frequency? What i want is to build a simple remote controlled device that sends pulse-s to trigger a programmed reciever circuit. Do you know any other simpler solutions?
     
  13. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    I used to build simplier solutions. A single transistor is all you need for a transmitter, it is definately not complex.

    What part of the world are you? It would help with parts, among other things.
     
  14. AAAGR

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 23, 2011
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    I am currently in the UK.
     
  15. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    My current thought is to build either a simple AM or FM transmitter circuit with a simple tone. You could use a minuature AM or FM radio with a tone decoder (most likely an op amp filter circuit) to activate a buzzer.

    I'm not where I can google on computer at the moment, you could google "simple transmitters" and see what comes up.
     
  16. AAAGR

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 23, 2011
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    Do you know any web sites with available schematics?
     
  17. Wendy

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    Mar 24, 2008
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    Off top of my head, nope. Google is your friend. Also, focus on HAM sites.
     
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  18. Wendy

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    AAAGR likes this.
  19. AAAGR

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 23, 2011
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    And what about the reciever? It is supposed to work using a 3V power supply.
     
  20. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Do you have to build a reciever, or can you buy off the shelf?
     
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