Transistor with multiple collecters and emitters?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by samoz, Jun 10, 2009.

  1. samoz

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 10, 2009
    7
    0
    Hi guys, this is my first post here, so bear with me!

    I'm trying to design a circuit that takes a 3 bit input to configure its operation. For the purpose of this question, I have 3 signals. say signal A, B, and C that I would like to route around my circuit using transistors. However, depending on which 3 bit input is given, the three signals will all be routed along a set path.

    For instance, if the 3 bit input is 101, A goes to pin 1 of a chip, B to pin 2, and C to pin 3. However, if the input is say 010, A would go to 4, B to 5, and C to 6.

    I realize that I could do something like this by placing 3 transistors per 3 bit input to route the signals, but I was wondering if there is anything similar to a transistor that has 3 collecters and emitters, but only 1 base? This would save me a lot of hassle (and board space).

    Thanks!

    P.S. Please don't tell me to reduce the 3 bit input to 2 bits; I know I can configure 3 signals with 2 bits, but I'm using the input signals elsewhere as well, so I need 3 bits.
     
  2. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    15,815
    282
    What is the nature of the signals? Are they digital or analog. If analog, what is the signal magnitude? Must signal quality be preserved?
     
  3. samoz

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 10, 2009
    7
    0
    They are digital, a simple 0 or 1. They will be specified by whether or not a jumper is set when the circuit has power applied to it.
     
  4. hobbyist

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 10, 2008
    764
    56
    If the inputs are parrallel then wouldn't you need 3 base's (input terminals) to rout the signals to there appropriate emitter, collector, junctions?
     
  5. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    15,815
    282
    Sounds like a multiplexer will do what you want. The type depends on the logic (TTL or CMOS) being used.
     
  6. AdrianN

    Active Member

    Apr 27, 2009
    97
    1
    Along beenthere's advise, this sounds like a combinatorial circuit to me. You have 3 inputs, A, B, C, 6 outputs, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and a 3-bit command. This can be achieved with a few gates if a commercially available multiplexer won't do the job.
     
Loading...