Transistor naming

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Hemasagar Babu, Nov 19, 2013.

  1. Hemasagar Babu

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 4, 2013
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    Hey,
    I'm an electronics student and naturally I've been dealing with transistors a lot. I've come across two transistors, the sl100 and sk100 which don't quite seem to agree with the transistor naming conventions. Can someone please tell me what sl and sk stand for in sl100 and sk100 respectively?
    Your help would be much appreciated
    Thank you :)
     
  2. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
    7,388
    1,605
    There's a standard transistor naming convention?

    Huh, who knew.
     
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  3. Nykolas

    Member

    Aug 27, 2013
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    There are 3 standards that I can think of: DIN, JIS and ANSI. At times manufacturers use their own designators to annoy us! E
     
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  4. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    My "favorite" is the BC series of transistors where everyone freely specifies, for example, BC337, but there are two extra digits on some to specify hfe (BC337-25, or BC337-40). Those with the two extra digits generally (but not always) have 800 mA rating, whereas those without the two extra digits tend to be rated at 500 mA. Additionally, some distributors are not even aware of the differences and group them all together as the same part for parametric searches.

    In other words, there is not even a standard within a series.
     
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  5. Hemasagar Babu

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 4, 2013
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    Thank you guys for taking the time to type in your replies. Any idea what sl and sk stand for? Or is it just a case of the manufacturer using two letters according to his fancy? I do remember reading somewhere that s tells you it has a high slew rate and l specifies its application (in the low frequency range). I wasn't convinced with that answer, and that's why I posted the question here
     
  6. dick56

    New Member

    Apr 27, 2011
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    http://www.engineersgarage.com/electronic-components/sl100-transistor

    The general consensus is the "S" stands for silicon and the "L" stands for low power. If you ever want to find the data sheet for any electronic item, just put the letters and numbers in a Google search, and you will have 1,000 answers in 0.9 seconds. Some of the numbers on an item are the manufacture date and don't pertain to your search. Try typing in sl100 and see what you get.

    Usually the date is the lower number and is stated like 1198 for November 1998 or 302 for March 2002.
     
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  7. Ramussons

    Active Member

    May 3, 2013
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    Yes, like PT4 and PT6 - Germanium 4W NPN PNP transistor pair with a TO3 casing.

    Ramesh
     
  8. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    There is also a date code like 8904 meaning the 4th week of 1989 and there is a "Julian" calendar which numbers the days of the year so 11320 might mean the 320th day of 2011.

    Just trying to be helpful.
     
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  9. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    SemiKron name the two complementary pair, SL100 NPN and SK100 PNP.
    Max.
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2013
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  10. Ramussons

    Active Member

    May 3, 2013
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    Is'nt it the other way around - SL=NPN; SK=PNP :confused:

    Ramesh
     
  11. Brainbox

    Member

    Nov 15, 2010
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    Far as I know there is only one code with a sort of distinction to specify semiconductors, named the Pro Electron code, used by European manufacturers.
    Nowadays almost every country has its own code.
     
  12. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    Yes, I corrected it.
    Max.
     
  13. K3CFC

    New Member

    Dec 4, 2012
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    SK100 is RCA number. the other one is anybody's guess
     
  14. Hemasagar Babu

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 4, 2013
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    I did search it up on google. I wasn't convinced with the answers. Every website I searched had its own theory
     
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