transformers

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by frankf, Apr 21, 2014.

  1. frankf

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 21, 2014
    1
    0
    I have a 9070T150D37 transformer
    Pri. 575/600 V Sec. has taps 110/115/120 to 220/230/240 v

    This is probably obvious but,

    Why, when I apply 120 V to the primary and get 24 volts on the secondary?
    what is the theory or rule of thumb applied?

    Thanks
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2014
  2. AnalogKid

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 1, 2013
    4,515
    1,246
    Why can you, or why can't you? Yes, you can.

    Most transformers don't really know about primary and secondary. They are two inductors coupled with a magnetic medium. As a don't care example, a common way to build a low-cost inverter is to use a 12 V power transformer, but drive the "secondary" with a 12 V square wave and get a 120 V square wave out of the "primary".

    As long as you don't overvoltage or overcurrent anything, the turns ratio and voltage ratio will hold for lower primary voltages. Large transformers do not work well with very light loads, but normal parts behave...normally.

    ak
     
  3. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,498
    2,364
    The secondary voltage is decided by the voltage applied to the primary and the direct turns ratio between primary winding and secondary.
    Max.
     
  4. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
    12,974
    3,220
    I would describe a transformer as a single inductor with multiple windings (except for an autotransformer which has a single winding).
     
  5. wmodavis

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 23, 2010
    737
    150
    https://www.google.com/search?q=transformer+turns+ratio
     
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