Transformer wiring question.

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by untranslate, Oct 6, 2016.

  1. untranslate

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 6, 2016
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    0
    I would like to wire a transformer for some Lichtenberg wood burning. This project is just for my personal entertainment and what ever I can learn along the way. My electrical experience is limited to mostly home repairs like lighting, hanging fans, replacing switches and tracking down those damn push-in-wires on electric out lets that ways get loose. I know the basic use of a multi meter and the basics of electrical safety (aka i don't work on any thing live and i have an 8ft 2x4 to flip questionable switches for the first time).
    Normally i would use a MO-Transformer for this project but i use them all up on a different project making a spot welder (it worked). I do happen to have a lighting transformer. I think it will work but im not 100% sure how to wire it correctly and its old so the wire labels are gone. This transformer has more wires than im sure what to do with. I would like to wire it to step up the voltage of your standard single pole 120v house receptacle.

    Here is the transformers diagram.

    [​IMG]

    This is the transformer in question.
    The wires labeled 3 starts near the inner side of the top coil
    2 and 4 are both two wires from the coil connected to a black wire.
    The wire label 120 is two wires from the bottom coil and one from the top that is coming from the inside of the coil.
    finally cap is a single wire from the out side bottom of the bottom coil.
    I would like to wire this to step up voltage. Thanks in advance for your advice and time.
    If i need to add more info please let me know. Thanks in again!


    [​IMG]
     
  2. tranzz4md

    Member

    Apr 10, 2015
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  3. untranslate

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 6, 2016
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    I thought that referred to the light bulb.
    The 300 OCV is the maximum Voltage of the transformer?
    I think most metal halide lamps need a high voltage pulse about 3000 -5000 volts.
    So i was thinking this transformer could be wired to stay at high volts instead of pulsing.
     
  4. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,347
    6,835
    The starting pulse for a lamp is created by a little circuit board called an, "ignitor". Most of what that ballast does is provide an inductance to limit the current through the bulb. You can use that one for a big inductor or an auto-transformer depending on how you connect it. It will not produce kilovolts.
     
  5. untranslate

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 6, 2016
    3
    0
    Ok i think i get it know. Thanks for the help!
     
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