Transformer selection

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by handyalbert11, Feb 16, 2011.

  1. handyalbert11

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 4, 2011
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    I have a generator that produces 220v and I need a transformer to step down to 110v. I am planning to power a standard size home refrigerator, 22" flat screen TV with a home theater system or an XBox, 2 or 3 lights, a microwave, and other small accessories. Any reccomendations on a good transformer to buy and where from? I would like to be able to wire it into a breaker panel not have to plug each seperate item into it. Thank you

    http://www.220converters.com/step-down-transformer-7500w.htm

    Would something like this work well in this situation?
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2011
  2. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    You need to add up all the wattages of those appliances and see if the genny can even supply that much power.

    That transformer might be very expensive.
     
  3. Jaguarjoe

    Active Member

    Apr 7, 2010
    770
    90
    Your generator is 220 and your service panel is also 220. Why put a boat anchor xfmr in between? Home Depot sells manual transfer switches that will safely and legally allow you to select mains power or gen power. There is space on the xfer panel to accomodate a handful of breakers to supply your chosen circuits. IIRC, instructions are included- if not, you will get thousands of hits on google like this one:

    http://www.anetstation.com/survival01.htm
     
  4. handyalbert11

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 4, 2011
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    Generator is an 8kw unit, will have to find wattage ratings. This is going in an application with only gen power. No transfer switches.
     
  5. handyalbert11

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 4, 2011
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  6. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    You have some excess capacity there. Not any point in the transformer being able to handle more power than the genny can put out.

    That separate panel is a good idea for load control. For safety, establish a made ground at the entry point and use three hole outlets for proper protection.
     
  7. aerofanatix

    New Member

    Feb 16, 2011
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    Hi, I think you have to first check on the gen specs, It normally works like this: If the output from the genny has four wires out the plug, it will be two live phases, a neutral , and an earth. If it has three wires, it probably is the two live phases and the neutral. The generator frame will be the earth. (if it is remotely located you might have to put a ground peg and connect to it as close to the generator as possible) The two live phases coming from your generator is the same as most homes have and the potential difference between each live an the neutral is 110 volt and will thus not need to be transformed. Just make sure that when you connect your equipment that you try and divide the load as evenly as possible. You can also safely run any 220 volt equipment on it. In the off chance you imported this unit from a 220 volt only country, it may have only 220v live to neutral but they are normally, manufactured to service all countries and the alteration could be made by changing the wiring internally, In this case the manufacturer or schematic diagram will solve the problem. Also make sure that it conforms to code before you operate it.
    Hope this helps
     
  8. handyalbert11

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 4, 2011
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    thanks for the replies, generator makes 220v only and I have spoken to a few different people and been told it can't be made to make 110v. So that is the reason i am looking for a transformer
     
  9. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    That makes the transformer necessary.
     
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