Transformer question

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by brucem, Jun 26, 2007.

  1. brucem

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2007
    2
    0
    Hi All

    Complete non-electrical :confused: guy here maybe thinking too much.

    Home project question. I have a significant amount of landscape lighting (12v) transformed from 110v to 12v through several transformers around the yard. I have one spot that I want to get 110v to which is only connected with a 12v landscape wire. I can't, without a significant amount of labor, run a direct 110v line to this area.

    Questions:

    Can I transform the 12v back to 110v with some sort of transformer ?
    If I bought a small landscape transformer could I just wire it backwards?
    Thoughts?

    thanks
    Bruce
     
  2. arthur92710

    Active Member

    Jun 25, 2007
    307
    1
    that would be cool! mabey i can take the 110v in the wall amd make it like 10000v that the power plant makes!

    i am not sure is there is one of those thing You need but i hope you find one.

    if not you can try inductive charging. its a way to send power wirelessly.
    if you do not need a lot of wattage it might not have to be very big. Mit was able to power a 60w light bulb with out wires acrrose the room.
     
  3. recca02

    Senior Member

    Apr 2, 2007
    1,211
    0
    if you want to transform 12 V to 110V just use the same transformers u used to get 12 V from 110 V. all u wud need to do wud be just connect the loww voltage side (the one whch gave u 12 V ) to 12V input and the high voltage side wud give u 110 V .
    any voltage can be stepped up to any desired voltage u just need a transformer manufactured for that ratio.
    this ratio is decided simply by the turns ratio of the primary and secondary.
    the input(primary side) can be used as secondary(output) and vice versa .they are interchangeable.the limit to wattage is from the amount of heat the transformer can safely handle (core and windings).

    any ways in my country power plants convert 15.75 kV to 220/400 kV and even 700 kV.
     
  4. mrmeval

    Distinguished Member

    Jun 30, 2006
    833
    2
    What will you be using the 110 for? Most of the 12V lighting transformers cannot handle a large amount of wattage. If they're 110V to 12vac transformers with no other components you could wire up the 12Vac side of one to the 12vac side of another and get 110vac out but I suspect you'll find that you won't have enough power to do much with it.
     
  5. recca02

    Senior Member

    Apr 2, 2007
    1,211
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    if the application requires a power more than what the transformers can handle i think you can go for transformers with larger ratings and having similar turn ratio.
     
  6. cumesoftware

    Senior Member

    Apr 27, 2007
    1,330
    10
    Well, it depends if the 12V are AC or not. If they are, this can be easily accomplished. But it is really better to run a 11V line to the area to avoid problems such as voltage deeps.

    Edit: ...But it is really better to run a 11V line to the area to avoid problems such as voltage deeps.
     
  7. brucem

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2007
    2
    0
    the transformers now reduce 120VAC to 12VAC.

    I would be using it to run a small pump.

    In looking at the "step-down" transformer they output a certain total # of watts, for example 600W. I guess that would be the limiting factor to determine the Watt requirements for everything hooked up to the "step-down" . So would need to determine how many watts would flow through the "step-up" transformer....??:confused:
     
  8. arthur92710

    Active Member

    Jun 25, 2007
    307
    1

    you mean 110v

    Hey take a photo of your project and post it!!
    it sounds really cool!:)
     
  9. pcharters

    New Member

    Jun 23, 2007
    4
    0
    If you really have a 600W capacity on the transformer now, that means it draws up to 5A from the primary (120VAC) and the secondary outputs up to 50A. A second transformer wired backwards at the other end would ideally take the 12VAC and transform it back to 120VAC allowing you to draw up to 5A. However, there are losses so don't expect more than 4 to 4.5A. Two fundamental laws of the universe - 1. you can't get something for nothing; and 2. you can't even break even.

    If you are powering a pump, check the voltage while the pump is running - if it is less than 100 - 105VAC, you had better find a different solution. Otherwise, you may burn out the pump motor.

    Don't forget that 120VAC is just as lethal coming from the transformer as it is coming from the house circuit.

    Pete
     
  10. cumesoftware

    Senior Member

    Apr 27, 2007
    1,330
    10
    My mistake. It is 110V indeed. Sorry for the typing error and thanks for correcting me.
     
  11. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
    6
    The actual limiting factor here is the ampacity of the 12V wiring. What size conductor is used? Number 4 conductor is needed to safely handle 50 amps. A lot of the 12V lighting wiring is 10 or 12 AWG, with some as small as 16 AWG. 12 AWG can only handle about 9 or 10 Amps, limiting power to around 100 Watts at 12V.

    How much power does the pump consume?
     
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