TO-220 Socket

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Joster, Oct 16, 2014.

  1. Joster

    Thread Starter Member

    Jun 12, 2013
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    Hi all,

    Looking for a good TO-220 Socket for some transistors. Googled it but did not see alot showing up. Can anyone point me in the right direction?
     
  2. MikeML

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 2, 2009
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    I have never seen a socket for TO220 devices, except possibly for testing them...
     
  3. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Repeating myself: You can't trust that much current to be reliable in a squeeze connector. Besides, the squeeze connector would be a poor conductor of heat and contribute to failure in that way, too. If you're testing hundreds of transistors, buy a ZIF (Zero Insertion Force) socket. Otherwise, solder it.
     
  4. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    I'll second the observation about never seeing a TO-220 socket. I'd be surprised if they exist.
     
  5. KJ6EAD

    Senior Member

    Apr 30, 2011
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  6. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    I'm surprised:eek:
     
  7. alfacliff

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2013
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    I justy changed some power mosfets in to 220 sockets. they use the induvidual machined sockets mounted on a pc board and are heatrsinked. the pin spacing is the same as 14 or 16 pin dip sockets. get a high quality 14 ot 16 pin dip socket, the kind with the machined round metal sockets, and cut out 3 to use for your socket. not the kind with the tin one sided internals.
     
  8. AnalogKid

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 1, 2013
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    TO-220 pins are on 0.1" centers like DIP pins, but they are a little fatter. Sockets that grip the edges might be overstressed, so I recommend something that makes contact with the flats. For normal applications, snap-off socket strips work well. If this is for device testing, then a specialty device is the only way to go.

    In the TO-220 package, the pins contribute almost nothing to the thermals. Thermally, the difference between socketing and soldering is very small.

    ak
     
  9. alfacliff

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2013
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    thats right, in the to220 package, but in the dip sockets current might be the limiting factor. and a flat mating surface of snap off is subject to corrosion.
     
  10. DNA Robotics

    Member

    Jun 13, 2014
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  11. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    That looks like a pretty good method...using screws to force a good contact area.
     
  12. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    If you're mounting a TO220 flat on a heatsink plate, you can just use a 3-wy 0.1" pitch fly-lead connector like used in TVs, VCRs etc.

    There used to be sockets for the old TO3 metal cans, you could bend the leads of a TO3P and mount it with just the single screw.

    AFAICR; the smaller size was TO66 - but there was a European version - close but not the same, and I can't remember which was which.
     
  13. KeepItSimpleStupid

    Well-Known Member

    Mar 4, 2014
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