Thinking of buying a Simpson 260

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Gdrumm, Mar 14, 2014.

  1. Gdrumm

    Thread Starter Distinguished Member

    Aug 29, 2008
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    Within say a $100.00 price range, what series of Simpson would be the best to buy? (probably from Ebay).

    I like nostalga, but also like function.

    A friend told me of a nice (highly valued) older one, but I don't recall what series it was.

    I'm just a novice home user, who works on TV's Microwaves, Fans, Heaters, and stuff like that.

    Thanks,
    Gary
     
  2. PatM

    Active Member

    Dec 31, 2010
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    I have a Triplett 630 PLK that is my nostalgia meter.
    I used it while troubleshooting at AT&T back in the middle 80'S
    Should be in your used price range.
     
  3. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    You should see the power supply engineer when I work: he has if not one then two Simpson 260's actively working on his test bench. I'll have to ask him why he chooses those.

    I used one when I was a kid, it was the meter of choice for the Long Island Railroad on which my Dad worked. Nightly I got to use his work meter.

    The 260 is a beautiful instrument that will never ever lie to you and will faithfully give you results. I do believe it has some weird (expensive) batteries inside to drive the ohmmeter.

    If you have a choice get one with the mirror on the scale: it's there so you don't parallax the reading.

    I've been thinking lately of getting one of these too.
     
  4. bountyhunter

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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  5. bountyhunter

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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  6. spinnaker

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 29, 2009
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    I sure wish I knew what happened to the test equipment at the tech school I used to attend. We had tons of those wonderful Simpsons in the property room.

    If I had my guess they went in the trash.
     
  7. bance

    Member

    Aug 11, 2012
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    Often the advantage of an old school analogue meter is that it has ranges that a DMM can only dream of......
     
  8. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    A Simpson 260 was my best friend in the 1970's. I walked into a TV shop just south of Chicago with a backlog of 400 and no repairman. In eight weeks, I fixed 394 of them with a Simpson, 2 with a scope, and 4 went to factory service because I couldn't figure them out. (Then I continued my journey to California.)

    What could be a better recommendation for a Simpson?
     
  9. inwo

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 7, 2013
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    Top shelf here. My second one. First was a roll-top.
    Original was getting tired after years of abuse from my learning days. Must have resoldered input fuse 50 times. Ohms ranges wouldn't zero.

    Sold it on ebay when this new-old-stock came up.

    Sometimes you just want analog with low impedance.

    Like my old low reading ohmmeter. Over 1 amp on the .1ohm scale.:eek:
     
  10. BReeves

    Member

    Nov 24, 2012
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    Anybody that has been around electronics for any length of time has a special feeling for the 260. Probably why they get so much for used ones, some of us old geezers have more money than sense. The only real negative on the 260 is never never drop it. If you don't break the bakelite case you will screw up the meter movement. Analog meters have a use but a digital with a bar graph is a much better choice.
     
  11. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Yeah, I get tired of alligatoring a resistor across my 10 meg Fluke input to measure small batteries. Darn surface charge will show good if you don't load them a little bit, like C/100
     
  12. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    1970 I came to Canada and in the brief interim got a similar Job, fixing Philips K6 and K7's, they separated the men from the boys, but guess what all tech's had as a TV?
    They were Hi-def, before there was Hi-def!
    Max.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2014
  13. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    During the 1970's When I was on active duty in the Marine Corps, I was a radar systems/missile fire control systems technician on the F-4J/S Phantom II; and the standard issue was the Simpson 260. They are really good analog meters. You do have to remember the 10k Ohms/volt loading though.
     
  14. tindel

    Active Member

    Sep 16, 2012
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    A while back someone neat me was selling two for $20. I should have jumped on that, but was to lazy
     
  15. Gdrumm

    Thread Starter Distinguished Member

    Aug 29, 2008
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    I bought a Series 7M off of ebay for $27.95 + S/H.
    It looks super clean in the photo.
    The seller said "THE NEDDLE ADJUSTMENT DOES NOT WORK, I PUT BATTERIES IN THE UNIT AND CHECKED VOLTS/OHMS WORKS..."

    I'm hoping it is the tit on back of the adjustment screw that was simply jarred out of position with the needle.

    I should get it by Friday.

    Thanks for the feedback.
    Gary
     
  16. ramancini8

    Member

    Jul 18, 2012
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    I own two or more. They don't lie like the digitals sometimes do. Excellent current meters, high enough input impedance, and the reverse switch is great for checking transistor and diodes.
     
  17. Gdrumm

    Thread Starter Distinguished Member

    Aug 29, 2008
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    I recieved my meter, and it looks pristine, inside and out.
    It doesn't look like it's ever been used to me.

    As some of you may have suspected, but didn't want to tell me, the little clear plastics tits on either side of the oms adjustment screw are broken off. (someone who didn't know better, cranked on it real hard I guess)

    It look like delicate work to change the needle assembly, and the entire face assembly will cost more than I paid for the meter.

    If anyone of you has experiece with this, please chime in with your suggestions.

    My first thought was "I can do without adjusting the needle".
    If I know it's off by 3-4 points, can't I just do the math?
    With no batteries in it, I just now gently adjusted it to zero, as a starting point.

    Of course I have several other meters with which I can check ohms.

    So, I'm just curious what you might think.
    Feel free to weigh in.

    I'm extremely pleased with the meter as is, and can't wait to get my test leads. I didn't reaslize the plugs for the leads were female, so I had to order a set.

    Thanks,
    Gary
     
  18. inwo

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 7, 2013
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    Do you mean the zero adjust? I think you can adjust that without the screw.
    Trial and error. Or leave the adjuster out.
     
  19. Gdrumm

    Thread Starter Distinguished Member

    Aug 29, 2008
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    Yes, the Zero adjust.

    I did adjust it by disassembling the meter and removing the cover.

    I guess I could do that every couple of months (to adjust for battery strength).
    Would I be adjusting for the 9 volt, or the 1.5 volt?

    I can use longer lasting batteries, to prolong the time between adjustments, etc.

    Thanks,
    Gary
     
  20. inwo

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 7, 2013
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    The zero adjust is mechanical.:confused: Voltage or settings won't have an effect.

    It just adjusts the return spring to zero.

    Or am I not understanding?

    I have never adjusted mine!
     
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