The weird components thread

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by takao21203, Mar 26, 2013.

  1. takao21203

    Thread Starter Distinguished Member

    Apr 28, 2012
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    Here my contribution for a start.

    A very old Motorola BD506, it is a PNP for 30V. With gold leads.
    Hard to say how old it is, could be well from the 1970s.

    I have a few more of these, but not really difficult to source a small PNP these days.
     
  2. atferrari

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 6, 2004
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    How do you now they are "gold leads"

    The datasheet I got says nothing about them.
     
  3. takao21203

    Thread Starter Distinguished Member

    Apr 28, 2012
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    Gold plated of course, not massive gold. Otherwise, they'd have attracted oxydization already.

    Back then, volumes were much lower, so they could afford gold plating.

    It is not really of much use for a PNP transistor.
     
  4. shortbus

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 30, 2009
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    Having worked where they make terminals, wire and plastic connectors mainly for automobile use, quite a few of the terminals in cars today are gold plated. But not the whole terminal, just the part where it contacts the pin of the device. Terminals are made from strips of copper, brass or bronze. And the plating is done in certain areas of the strip before being formed in a progressive die. The plating was done in house in a secured area, so never got to see how the plating was done in limited area of a strip.
     
  5. Ron H

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    I have some CK722s from the 1950s.
     
  6. DerStrom8

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    Those were high-end modern technology in the '50s! :D
     
  7. THE_RB

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    Feb 11, 2008
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    Nice! :)

    I've got some resistors so old they were hand wound in resistance wire, painted grey and the value hand-written on in text. Looks like paint too with an incredibly fine brush... Possibly WW2 era when there were factories of hard working females doing incredibly hands-on type work. :)
     
  8. Ron H

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    Wow! I've never seen one of those.
     
  9. THE_RB

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    I'll have a look for them when I'm in the workshop. They are not in my general usage parts so will likely be buried in a box of obsolete stuff somewhere... ;)

    I think there's a little wooden spool of resistance winding wire in that old junk too. It's finer than human hair.
     
  10. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    I have a handful of these stud mounted devices. I assume that the label on the box refers to these components.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  11. DerStrom8

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    Well I found this. Not sure if it's what you're looking for--this one is a DLT/1000:

     
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  12. MrChips

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    Oct 2, 2009
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    Sounds close. I will check the capacitance. Thanks for this.

    Bingo. I found the data sheet at Farnell. Still made by Oxley. Amazing!
     
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  13. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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    Hello,

    The feed through capacitors are well know by RF people.
    I have a couple on this picture I have taken:

    [​IMG]

    I also got some (not so common) RF parts here:

    [​IMG]

    On the left side there is a CA2820 RF power amplifier.
    On the right side there is the 2N3375, a RF power transistor.

    On the next picture I got some led displays and a led bar:

    [​IMG]

    Bertus
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2013
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  14. DerStrom8

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    Those are great Bertus. Thanks for sharing :)
     
  15. atferrari

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 6, 2004
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    -10% +80%

    Tell me about tolerances!!
     
  16. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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    Hello,

    Here is the next couple of components:

    [​IMG]

    On the left there is the KMZ10 hall sensor.
    On the right there is the BB112 varicap diode (look at the connections).

    Bertus
     
  17. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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    Hello,

    I have taken a look in my collection and found these old parts.
    (All parts shown - also in previous posts - are all owned by me).
    (all pictures are taken at home with a simple digital camera).

    Some tape heads:

    [​IMG]

    Some old inductors (made by philips) :

    [​IMG]

    Some ceramic pipe capacitors:

    [​IMG]

    And the old germanium transistors AC126 and AC128:

    [​IMG]

    Bertus
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2013
  18. debe

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2010
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    This is a Klystron tube from a 1960s Decca radar, it generates microwave energy for the reciever mixer. The course tuning is by altering the length of the tube by a threaded screw arangement.
     
  19. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    Photo1;
    Top; 1980's mass produced microwave oven leak detector, made in response to public fear about microwave ovens cooking their brains. :)
    It has a diode as a detector, a transistor and LED, all self powered.

    Middle; very heavy PTC thermistor for high current degaussing on old 60's TVs.
    Mil spec LM741 from the 70's in metal can with 8 gold plated legs.
    300nS delay line, looks to be hand assembled and epoxied, possibly 1960's early colour TV use?
    Assortment of very weird LED shapes.

    Bottom; diodes of unusual shapes and sizes from 1960's-70's, maybe even late 50's?

    Photo2; My all time favorite weird electronic parts! These are bright pink ceramic very high voltage TO-3 insulators. They are VERY hard and make cool "shiiick" sounds when rubbed together, and best of all they feel ice cold when you first pick them up. It must be some very highly thermally conductive ceramic, they feel much colder then say glass or any type of stone that i have felt. I think 1970's, from bigscreen TVs.

    Photo3; The world's biggest hard drive! Yes that is a full size filing cabinet behind it. The voice coil alone (the dirty cylinder top left) is solid steel copper and ferrite and weighs over 20 pounds. The aluminium chassis now sold for scrap weighed 30 pounds. The entire hard drive was wider then the filing cabinet, and almost as tall as one drawer, and took two strong men to carry it. All the electronics and steel covers have been sold for scrap.

    Sorry I can't remember the brand but the capacity was 44000 bytes (yes, 44 kb!) and it is from the age of mainframe computers that had magnetic tape reels, and this was the very first type of hard drive. Probably late 1960's.
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2013
  20. debe

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2010
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    Hi RB, the thermistor was used in old 60s valve B&W TVs as a surge protector, have several from old STC B&W TVs. They were also used in projectors to give longer life to the globes limiting the turn on surge. as they got hotter the resistance reduced. Heres an old STC spec sheet with prices. Still have several salvaged about 45yrs ago some were. The bright pink ceramic T03 insulators were used in HMV Australian built colour TVs in the SMPS in the mid 70s, still have some of them somwhere as i used to repair them.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2013
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