The story of numbers

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by vvkannan, Apr 8, 2009.

  1. vvkannan

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Aug 9, 2008
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    I found this interesting
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2009
  2. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    That is a signup screen for Gmail. Why is it interesting?
     
  3. vvkannan

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Aug 9, 2008
    138
    11
    Sorry it was a ppt file and i could not attach it properly

    Here it is hope i got it right
     
  4. KL7AJ

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 4, 2008
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    That is really cool! I'll pass it along to my ham radio forum. :)

    Thanks!
     
  5. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    That's an interesting take on it.

    I watched some of the James Burke series on inventions that changed history. The one on bringing Arabic numerals into Europe was cute:

    "How do you write a zero?"

    "Just make a hole on the page."
     
  6. KL7AJ

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 4, 2008
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    You should never teach math to kids. Here's why.

    When my youngest daughter was around 5, she had a plate of cookies. I asked her for a cookie. She gave me a cookie. I told her, "You know I hate odd numbers. I need TWO cookies."

    She took my cookie back and said, "Zero is an even number, too!"

    Lesson learned. :)

    eric
     
  7. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
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    That's pretty good actually; whether factually true or not (the number 9 seemed a little fudged at the bottom loop, as did 7). That said, there is probably some seed of truth in it.

    This thread reminded me of a series of programmes the BBC did on Radio 4 a couple of years back about numbers, looking at some of the most important numbers and their significance in mathematics, science, and nature; including 0, 1, π, e, the golden ratio (~ 1.618), and ∞. If you're in the UK it might be worth a look up (people outside the UK may be able to get the series on the BBC World site).

    Dave
     
  8. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
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    Smart girl! :D

    Dave
     
  9. studiot

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 9, 2007
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    One difficulty I found with Arabic numerals, when working in the middle east, was that the Arabic zero is a decimal point, and our 5 is written 0

    So I kept thinking something priced at 0. riyals was cheap - it would have been except this translates as 50 riyals in western numbers
     
  10. Mark44

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 26, 2007
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    The author of pdf describes "Roman algorithms" and "Arabic algorithms" where I'm pretty sure he/she means Roman/Arabic numerals. An algorithm is a procedure for doing something (and itself is an Arabic word).

    I don't think I buy the business about the numbers coming from the angles in them.
     
  11. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
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    BBC: 5 NUMBERS The First Series, mentioned above.
    BBC: ANOTHER 5 NUMBERS Second Series

    --ETA: Largest Prime Number now known is Mersenne prime, 2^{43,112,609}-1, a 12,978,189 digit number
    The Second Series (From 2003) states it as
    2^{13,466,917} -1, 4,053,900 digits long. There were 39 known Mersenne Primes in Oct, 2003, there are now at least 46 known, all since 1996 discovered by GIMPS

    <SideTrack>
    GIMPS at 47 TeraFlops the 5th largest distributed computing supercomputer, similar to folding@home- the fastest "computer" in the world at 8.1 PetaFlops, and SETI@Home 528 TeraFlops. By comparison, the fastest "standalone" Supercomputer as of 11/2008, IBM's Roadrunner is 1.1 Petaflops.
    </SideTrack>
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2009
  12. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
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    Ah yes, that was the series. I recall the first series first time around on Radio 4; I don't think I've had a listen to all of series 2. I also got it wrong slightly, 1 isn't in the first series, but i (or j to us EEs) is. Nice to see it is still accessible so I can listen again. I assume you can listen outside of the UK?

    And where will it be in another 6 years I wonder?

    That's not bad for a standalone. The biggest problem is an OS that can manage efficiently such power and resources.

    Dave
     
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