E-book Correction The Shockley Diode - invalid current direction

Discussion in 'Feedback and Suggestions' started by Maksym Ganenko, Mar 9, 2015.

  1. Maksym Ganenko

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 9, 2015
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  2. MikeML

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 2, 2009
    5,450
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    Welcome Maksym,

    I agree with you.

    The EBooks on this website do nothing but confuse students coming here because it tries (and fails) to explain how semiconductors, electronics and circuits work using "Electron" current, while 99% of the real world, science, academia, and engineering uses Conventional Current.

    If you spend any time here, you will learn to ignore the EBooks just as the rest of us do...
     
  3. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,765
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    Conventional flow vs Electron Flow

    I learned electron current way back when, and there are a lot oif applications, such as vacuum tubes and sputtering machines, where it matters. Tain't gonna change. I agree with the book myself.
     
  4. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Yeah, it's awfully confusing to think in terms of electrons moving, but if you think the other way, something with a positive charge has to jump off the front of a CRT oscilloscope at exactly the right moment to describe the voltage that is changing in the real world. The idea of a directional, proton sucking cathode does''t seem to work...so far.
     
  5. Maksym Ganenko

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 9, 2015
    5
    1
    Thanks for you replies! I found thyristor chapter to be quite descriptive except for current direction which was confusing. I wasn't going to read the book from the beginning, so I didn't know about the "electron current" principle used for examples. Back in the school I could easily think that way, but later I found the positive current to be more convenient as you get current going from higher potential to lower potential. Also, the charge carriers can be positive for some electronic devices, like semiconductors or chemical cells.
     
  6. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,278
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    Seriously...You have to learn to think in both directions. Positive flow is more convenient, even instinctive. If only Ben Franklin had called the electron, "positive" we wouldn't have these problems. :D

    It's all relative (in the thinking process).
     
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