The computer games industry

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Thinker, Jan 16, 2007.

  1. Thinker

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 9, 2007
    61
    0
    Hello guys,

    I live in London and i was wondering how it is possible to get into the computer games industry?

    I want to do programing or graphics design if i can work in the industry.
     
  2. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
    6,960
    143
    I couldn't comment specifically, but I would say that the competition for positions in the industry is pretty intense given the nature of that line of business.

    Speaking from a personal level, if I were looking for someone to work for me designing and programming games I would look for someone with a portfolio, i.e. someone with experience (not always the case) or someone who has designed games of their own possibly in their spare time. I would suggest that you look into what you have to offer and if possible get into programming some (simple) games of your own - this shows that you have not only programming skills, but also imagination. With the range of tools available on the net there is no reason you cannot start doing this to help your case.

    As for where someone would pick you up, you could look out for Fairs taylored towards the computer games industry, most probably hosted at your local (or not so local as the case may be) University. As with all things like this, its a case of putting yourself out there.

    Dave
     
  3. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    9,898
    1,722
    Identify the companies
    Go where they are
    Learn Japanese
     
  4. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
    6,960
    143
    Isn't a lot of it in the States now? (Thinking of Electronic Arts and the ilk)

    Dave
     
  5. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
    6
    For graphic design, one must have an artist's background. The "electric brush" is no different from any other art media. It can only be wielded by those who have learned to draw.

    If you can already use the "electric brush," then work up a portfolio with images using the fewest possible number of polygons. Any artist can make a decent image with unlimited system resources. The game industry wants artists who can make decent images on a budget. (Several budgets, actually: limited system resources; short man-hours; tight deadlines; limited money...)
     
  6. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    15,815
    282
    Hi,

    Program up a really good A.I. and name your price.
     
  7. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    9,898
    1,722
    I could be wrong but I don't think Sony or Nintendo do game development in the US or the UK - it's too expensive.
     
  8. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
    6,960
    143
    Not so much Sony and Nintendo, who do both hardware and software development, but more the likes of Electronic Arts, Codemaster etc, who focus primarily on software development of particular gaming brands.

    Dave
     
  9. Thinker

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 9, 2007
    61
    0
    Dave at the moment the only program language i have learnt is Pascal and Visual Basic, and i'm sure you can't make computer game out of that. I'm going to be doing C++ next year on my course.

    Which tools/software on the net should i be looking to use to program some of my own games?
     
  10. Thinker

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 9, 2007
    61
    0
    Another question i want to be working as a games programmer or graphics designer, so which kind of course should i be looking to apply for in University.

    Also is their any good companies that create games in England, that I could possible work for them in the future?
     
  11. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
    6
    For programming, you'll want programming classes. (I get paid extra at work for knowing answers like this one. :))

    For graphics design, you'll want art classes.

    This thread is about two distinct disciplines (software engeneering and graphic art) with different requirements. One is about writng endless lines of code to emulate moving objects. The other is about drawing endless renditions of the same objects from different perspectives.
     
  12. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
    6,960
    143
    That is dependant on the types of games you wish to work on. If you are looking at the lower end of the market - i.e. simple web/mobile-based games, then you would be advise to look at C++ and Java as your best options. For Java, you could look at Eclipse as a dev tool for programming, and get a good book to teach you the rudiments. As for the more advanced games - i.e. 3-D games, then there is more a case of matrix manipulation therefore you are more likely to be using lower-level languages such as C. I can't be sure for certain, but this would be my take on it.

    Dave
     
  13. Thinker

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 9, 2007
    61
    0
    Hi Dave,

    So do you think i should be reading books that teaches and explains C++ and Java to get me started?

    Because i would like to start in the lower end of things like simple mobile gaming, so i can develop my programming skills and when i start getting better maybe start working on advanced games.

    Have to get focused though!
     
  14. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
    6,960
    143
    If that is the case, then I personally recommend you look at Java due to its cross-platform capabilities (other may disagree here). You need to get some experience with Java (or any other language you wish to work with), so would recommend that you get you programming skills up to scratch. For Java, I recommend you look at Objects First with Java - A Practical Introduction using BlueJ. This book will give you a good grounding and if I recall has a couple of game examples that you can develop yourself (don't quote me on that one). BlueJ is a development environment for Java developed at some Danish University (available as a free download), which in the past used to be a little buggy though the last version I tried was pretty stable. As you get more comfortable you will probably want to get into using Eclipse, which is for serious devs.

    Can I bring your attention to the International Game Developers Association (IGDA) and in particular their "Breaking In" page.

    Dave
     
  15. Thinker

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 9, 2007
    61
    0
    Thanks a lot Dave, i'll be looking forward to reading that book (where is the cheapest place i can buy it BTW).

    Thanks for the link to. :)
     
  16. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
    6,960
    143
    Its a while since I ordered it. I had to order it through a local library because I couldn't get it on-line. From browsing over at Amazon, it appears as though the second edition of the book has been released recently. You should also note the good reviews this book has.

    Dave
     
  17. playstation.aneesh

    Active Member

    Jan 8, 2008
    47
    0
    How abt simple testing game jobs without employing much of programming as i have exposure towards consoles and basic computer hardware.. my qualification is engineering in electricals \electronics with 2 years of experince as a Patent analyst
     
  18. Machine

    New Member

    Dec 9, 2007
    2
    0
    Hey Thinker, for this field you should consider joining a big game modification project. I'm currently working on one for HL2 as designer 3D modeler and a lot of people on the team have industry job, its a great way to make contacts and gain experience. Its a big plus to have mod experience, many people get into game development trough modding. HeHe, just noticed how old this is :)
     
Loading...