The Case Against Patents

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by thatoneguy, Oct 23, 2010.

  1. thatoneguy

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    Last edited: Oct 23, 2010
    tom66 and FastEddie like this.
  2. tom66

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  3. someonesdad

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    A major consideration today is whether you have the muscle (both the financial resources and the management will) to defend your patents, both in the issuing country and around the world. Few individuals do. The litigation costs can kill you, even if you're in the right.
     
  4. tracecom

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  5. tom66

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    Why don't you ask him yourself? :confused:
     
  6. tracecom

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    Tom66,

    Although I quoted your post, I didn't intend for my silly question to be directed to you. I thought Dave's delivery was rather intense and was attempting humor. Sorry if you were put off; no offense was intended to you, Dave, or anyone.
     
  7. thatoneguy

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    That's pretty much it in a nutshell. The patent only gives you a right to sue. The article states that due to cost of law firms, in order to make a profit off a patent, one would need to sell $12 million worth of the product the patent is for in order to break even, at which point, the patent doesn't mean anything anyway, since you are already a millionaire.

    The "obvious to an expert in the field" is especially applicable to any electronic circuit patents. Easily shot down.

    There are still open patent conflicts between Unix and MacOS, as well as Microsoft and Apple over OS user interfaces. If THEY are unable to make anything out of a patent other than losses, the chances an average person would be able to is close to zero.

    Not to mention that an idea doesn't even need to exist or function as stated to be granted. Too many people assume that since something is patented, it is "good".
     
  8. JoeJester

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    Stanley Meyers comes to mind ... as does Keely Motor Company.
     
  9. t_n_k

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    There's a lot of interest in and controversy about the patenting of defective human genes. Patenting the outcome of either natural selection or creation (whichever suits an individuals' perspective)...? Makes ones' blood boil, perhaps.
     
  10. loosewire

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    The 24/7 ads of gimicks make millions,once you get
    the attention of hedge funds. All the Items have all
    kinds of claims,but they make millions of dollars.
    Again It takes big backers that have to supply the ad
    money.
    The patent office and there rules and there researchers
    opinions get In the way of the process. They some 90
    day rules that works In the attorneys favor. If you have
    had a first hand experience that has cost you money,
    you will learn how to built a better mouse trap. Is there
    a need for the product,will It sell,can you find a backer
    to promote your product. Big business,the universities
    and the government are patent machines.The congress
    has changed laws to help wiggle a patent to fit lobbist
    change a few words to make It fit.
     
  11. JoeJester

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  12. loosewire

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    @ joe, R.C.A. t.v. had A.M. sound until congress got Involved
    so that T.V.could have F.M. sound.In hind site you could say that
    was good for the public at large,bad for F.M. Inventor,he took his
    life.
     
  13. JoeJester

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    Major EH Armstroing ...

    His wife, however, got some cash from RCA after winning the patent battle over FM.

    I wouldn't doubt Congress had their fingers in the mix. TV Channel 1 must have been one frequency no one wanted. I'm trying to remember if I ever saw an analog TV with Channel 1.

    Back to the topic ... EH's patent fight certainly does fit the topic.

    I found it interesting that EHA was able to describe how the audion valve worked, something De Forrest couldn't.

    Thanks for bringing someone more revelent than Meyers and Keely into the discussion.
     
  14. blueroomelectronics

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    Patents once served to protect the inventor but nowadays it's the money that wins.
     
  15. tracecom

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    True...but isn't that the case with most things? Power wins and money means power.
     
  16. loosewire

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    T.V.A. - T.V.A. Power.
     
  17. thatoneguy

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    That concept pretty much ended when Edison hired a lot of lawyers to "get around" Tesla's patents.

    Edison didn't create nearly as much as he stole. Tesla created a great deal. Tesla is the one that died penniless.
     
  18. JoeJester

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    Patents don't protect the little guy. You need the wherewithall to fight and the resources (or a lawyer willing to win in order to get paid) to proceed with the fight.

    Edison is a good example of superior resources when fighting Telsa.

    Armstrong was uncompromising and faced a very long battle to the death. His widow worked the deal with RCA.

    Only history is forgiving. Armstrong received the credit in the end.

    I'm sure patent number US0000001, attached here, may have been copied. When I was looking at Armstrong's patents, I had to look at patent 1 ... just to see what it was about.
     
  19. thatoneguy

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    From: What happened to Channel 1

    Channel 1 effectively died in 1946. Thanks, FCC
     
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