The 8pin PIC for a USB Device? (USB Output Host)

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by ajm113, Apr 10, 2011.

  1. ajm113

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 19, 2011
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    Hello, I'm not sure what would be the best pick, but I'm looking for a small PIC I could program and use for small devices that 'only' do output and I'm sure at the top of your head your going to recommend me Teensy or Arduino, but I want to make this from scratch since it sound fun. :D Also if it's not possible with 8 pins, I may just go with the ATmega8/ATmega328.

    I'm already highly skilled in C++/C so writing the PIC and the device software should be no problem for me on Windows with a small push in the right direction. The reason why I'm looking for a small PIC, three reasons: I only want to turn something on or off using the Output voltage from it. I don't want to get a PIC and only use %50 percent of what it can do. I want to make my USB device small as possible.

    And one more thing, is there a good source on writing USB drive/software for USB pic? I'm looking to make a very basic console app which I can just put in floating numbers or int.

    I was thinking on just turning on and or off a relay or maybe some other things.

    Thanks, Andrew.
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2011
  2. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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  3. blueroomelectronics

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jul 22, 2007
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    No 8 pin devices have USB and you need an OTG (host) PIC.
    The 18F2550 is a popular USB slave PIC.
     
  4. ajm113

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 19, 2011
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    Awesome! Thanks guys, also if you don't mind me asking, do you know where I can find a cheap programmer for the 18F2550 that uses USB connection?

    My computer doesn't have a 25 pin printer connection sadly and I've seen some online you can make your self, but my machine doesn't have the same connections.

    I seen Microchip have the PICKit, but I was wondering if there was a cheaper alternative? (My job has cut my hours dramatically)
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2011
  5. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    I'll suggest that you go with a Microchip programmer that supports the PICs that you want to program. If you purchase a 3rd party programmer, you are then "married" to that 3rd party for support for that programmer. If it doesn't work properly, you may spend untold hours trying to get it to work before abandoning it for a PICkit.

    The ICSP works quite well by all reports.
     
  6. ajm113

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 19, 2011
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    Last edited: Apr 10, 2011
  7. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    No, ICSP is IN CIRCUIT SERIAL PROGRAMMING

    It means the uC can be programmed IN CIRCUIT. You do not need to remove the PIC from the circuit to program it.

    It by no means has to do with price/value. It is just a technological advancement.
    http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/devicedoc/30277d.pdf
     
  8. ajm113

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 19, 2011
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    Ohh I understand now, okay well, I guest I found what I was looking for then. :)

    Thanks for you help! I'll look into buying that programmer I found then.
     
  9. ke5nnt

    Active Member

    Mar 1, 2009
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    Years ago I bought a PIC Programmer on eBay from China that connected to the PC with a USB port. Came with drivers that tricked the USB port into thinking it was a serial connection. It's one of those mini-disks but you can find the drivers online if you can't get a mini-disk to read in your ROM drive. I still use this programmer today and haven't had any trouble with it. $28.00 on ebay as long as you don't mind waiting forever for it to arrive from Hong Kong. Check it out here. It does ship registered airmail but I seem to remember still waiting about 4 weeks before mine finally showed up, and since it came from China, no tracking number :(

    A list of supported PIC micros is on that ebay page.
     
  10. Markd77

    Senior Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    I bought exactly the same a couple of years ago from him. It is a PICKIT2 clone and I've had no problem with it. It can even be used as a logic analyser with the PICKIT2 software (although the real PICKIT2 has one more wire which can be used for an extra channel).

    Also get something like this:
    http://cgi.ebay.com/5-pcs-40-Pin-2-...803?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3a4e1b14c3
    It can be cut into lengths of 5 and will connect the programmer to a solderless breadboard.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2011
  11. ajm113

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 19, 2011
    176
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    @ke5nnt:

    Yeah I hate that when that happens when you have to buy something out of the states and there is no number to track it or if there is the company shipping your item doesn't do a good job at updating, and it becomes kind of in a hurry to hear or see it's current status or if it's waiting in front of your door step. hahah I bought a item once and checked my front door 2 times a day to see if what I bought arrived. :) Thanks for the information, but I went ahead and bought that iCP01 USB Microchip I posted, service was pretty good!

    @Markd77
    I bought it! ^^ Like I mentioned to ke5nnt, the service was so good, that I asked if they could throw those pins in for a few more bucks. They told me its on the house if I left a note on the shipping to add it. So I'm going to put them on my favorites list, it takes stuff like that to get a place on my bookmarks.

    Heck my email company isn't even on my favorites and I check my email 3-7 times a day.
     
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